Tag Archives: Sage Williams

College Begins Recognition of DAISY Honorees

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Sage Williams (left), Dean Patty Ravert, and Julie Valentine.

The BYU College of Nursing has partnered with the DAISY Foundation to begin a new tradition and recognize an extraordinary nursing faculty and student each semester. Last October we were pleased to recognize assistant professor Dr. Julie Valentine with the first DAISY Faculty Award and Sage Williams as the DAISY In Training Award recipient.

The DAISY Foundation (an acronym for Diseases Attacking the Immune System) was established in 1999 by the family of Patrick Barnes, as a way to honor him after he died of complications of the auto-immune disease ITP. Pat’s family created the DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses to honor registered nurses who make a difference in the lives of patients and families experiences in healthcare (some of our alumni have received this distinction).

The DAISY Faculty Award provides national recognition and appreciation to nursing faculty for their commitment and inspirational influence on their students. The DAISY Student In Training Award is designed to remind students, even on their toughest days in nursing school, why they want to be a nurse.

Each January and September, the College of Nursing will accept nominations at nursing.byu.edu of a nursing professor or student that reflects compassion and exemplifies the Healer’s art. Recognition occurs at the college’s professionalism conference in February and the scholarly works and contribution to the discipline conference in October.

DAISY Faculty Award

CMH01731-1Julie Valentine is an assistant professor and also a certified adult/adolescent sexual assault nurse. Dr. Valentine focuses on multidisciplinary, collaborative research studies uniting disciplines in sexual assault case reform to benefit victims and case processing. In 2015 she was the primary author of two grants totaling $3.2 million for the testing of previously untested sexual assault kits and the resulting investigation and prosecution of these rape cases in Utah.

She is engaged in a collaborative research project with the Utah state crime laboratory exploring the impact of new DNA testing methods in sexual assault cases, and a collaborative law enforcement study on trauma-informed victim interviewing in sexual assault cases. From 2014 to 2017, she served on the Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence Reporting committee with the National Institute of Justice developing national best practice policies in sexual assault cases.

In 2016 Dr. Valentine served on the BYU Advisory Council on Campus Response to Sexual Misconduct which investigated Title IX implementation and recommended substantial policy and structural changes. As a mother of eight children and two grandchildren, Julie is an influential teacher wherever she goes. Whether at the lectern, hospital, courtroom, legislative floor, church or home, she shows love, compassion, and a kind listening ear with everyone.

Of interest, her favorite holiday is Valentine’s day, when her family sends our Valentine cards and enjoys making dozens of yummy treats to share with neighbors, friends, and co-workers.

DAISY In Training Award

CMH01733-2Sage Williams (BS ’17) became a research assistant at the end of nursing semester one, working with faculty members Dr. Julie Valentine, Dr. Linda Mabey, and Dr. Leslie Miles on multiple research studies on sexual assault victims throughout Utah. Her passion for caring for underserved and vulnerable individuals expands beyond the research arena to immersing herself in volunteer work.

She takes a monthly 48-hour call as a victim’s advocate in Utah County for sexual assault victims with Center for Women and Children in Crisis, volunteers at the University of Utah Health Burn Camp program for children, and worked this past summer in a family refugee camp in Greece for children and families fleeing Syria. Of note, she left the camp to join faculty members in Dublin, Ireland to present at the International Sigma Theta Tau conference. While there, Sage only had sandals to wear because she had given her shoes to those more in need at the refugee camp.

Her plans include obtaining a DNP as a psychiatric mental health nurse. She is truly an exceptional nursing student who emulates the Healer’s art and will make a difference in the world, especially with those who have been traumatized.

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