Category Archives: Good to know

The Universal Language of Healthcare – Being a Medical Interpreter

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The skills to interpret Spanish in medical settings have become very useful for student Page Turley. Photo courtesy of Turley.

By Quincey Taylor

When sixth semester student Page Turley found herself in Peruvian hospitals with her companions during her mission, little did she know that understanding medical Spanish would soon become her norm.

Turley is one of the few students that has taken the necessary classes to become a Spanish medical interpreter. Even though the skill only requires two additional classes, nursing students that are registered medical interpreters are rare. Turley is hoping to change that. It is by learning about another culture that Turley has truly learned the language of healthcare – love.

When Turley started her Spanish minor, she had no idea that medical interpretation would be part of it. It started when she took a Spanish medical terminology class. She says, “I loved it. It brought back all the anatomy terms I had learned in nursing.” Her professor, Charles Lemon, approached her about taking the follow-up class in order to qualify as a medical interpreter.

Turley was interested, but the class fell on Thursday during her nursing clinicals. There was no way to work it in. However, Professor Lemon saw potential in Turley and wanted to help her in her future profession. “Even though I had clinicals every Thursday, he would meet with me a different day of the week to make up the class I missed,” says Turley. It was through his help and Turley’s determination that she completed the courses.

Turley says, “The College of Nursing emphasizes caring for people holistically. We’re not just treating patients’ physical symptoms, but we are helping them emotionally, mentally and spiritually. One of the aspects of that is providing culturally-sensitive care. Doing a Spanish minor has helped me understand another culture a little better. It will help me be a better nurse.”

During her fourth semester, Turley was able to use her skills during the Spain section of the clinical practicum for the public and global health nursing course. Many students in her section had served Spanish-speaking missions, but they had never learned the medical side of the language. This set Turley apart.

Turley also used her skills during her pediatric rotation. A family came to the hospital with a sick little girl and neither of the parents spoke English. The doctor responded by turning to the online interpreting service normally used. However, in that moment the computer crashed and the service wouldn’t work. Turley remembers, “There was no way for the doctor to communicate with this family. They needed help right away. It felt awesome to be able to step up and say, ‘I can do it for you if you need it.’ It was a good back-up plan.”

After this experience, Turley saw the true value in her skill. She says, “Even if patients speak English it’s hard to go to the hospital and completely understand exactly what’s going on. Add another barrier, and it makes the experience more difficult and scary for them. There is so much risk for confusion. Just being informed can take away some of the scary nature, even if the situation itself doesn’t change.”

By completing the classes, students can become nationally recognized as medical interpreters. They are required to take a test to prove their competency and may be additionally tested at their job.

After graduation, Turley hopes to work in oncology, continuing using her skills as often as possible.

Studio C puts the “C” in NLC

By Corbin Smith

Trivia time.

Ready?

Are you sure?

Name a comedy sketch show that finds its roots from BYU. It’s now in its 10th season, featuring brand new cast members this year!

Do you know it yet? Maybe this will help.

They are the creators of some viral comedy sketches you may remember. Does the name Scott Sterling ring any bells? What about the worst doctor ever? If not, surely you have seen the one-millionth death!

You got it! It’s Studio C!

Studio C is a comedy sketch television show, similar to Saturday Night Live, that has been produced by BYUtv since 2012. Over the last 8 years, Studio C has shown over 130 episodes, gained over 2.3 million subscribers on YouTube and has had almost 2 billion total views on those videos.

Studio C’s sketches cover a humongous range of subjects. The original 10 cast members performed memorable sketches about anxious secret agents, diving national champions and even a quirky chef obsessed with bisque!

Now the question is: Why would we, the BYU College of Nursing, care? We aren’t necessarily the funniest college on campus (although if you look far enough back on our Instagram page, you might find some memes that will give you a good chuckle). Also, none of the cast members are College of Nursing alumnus, either. Why, then, are we writing about it?

Maybe you can find the answer in these videos:

Did you notice anything familiar? Anything you may have seen or maybe even worked in before?

The curtains must have given it away. The secret is out. Studio C crashed the NLC!

Since the Mary Jane Rawlinson Geertson Nursing Learning Center had its 4 million dollar renovation in 2014, the Studio C cast has visited us multiple times to film some of the memorable sketches we know and love. There might be some future episodes featuring our NLC as well. Make sure to keep your eyes glued to the screen to see how Studio C uses our facility next! Enjoy!

 

 

Historic: Meeting Three Ghanaian Chiefs

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Traditional Ghanaian chief (center) was happy to meet with BYU nursing students as they asked for his permission to perform health screenings.

By Quincey Taylor

Ghana’s government is a unique mix of modern ideals and tribal tradition. They operate under a parliamentary democracy with a president and a separate judiciary branch. However, the constitution also protects the rights of local tribal chiefs, who demonstrate traditional authority and political influence in a changing world.

There are many different tribes in Ghana, each with their own king or chief. Passed down from father to son, or in some cases mother to daughter, this authority makes the ruler a custodian of the land traditionally owned by the tribe. They retain the culture of the tribe and continue with cultural customs.

When our 2019 Ghana section of the clinical practicum for the public and global health nursing course came to Ghana and began their work, they were asked to meet with not one of the chiefs like in past years, but three! This honor was appreciated and felt by all who participated, faculty and students alike.

Assistant teaching professor Dr. Michael Thomas said about the special experience, “We were wanting to do health screenings and we wanted to be as culturally respectful as possible, so we had the opportunity to actually ask the chief and get permission.”

One of the chiefs they met (pictured above) had an interesting story. He lived in the U.S. for years and became a professor. He was living a good life when he heard his grandfather in Ghana had passed away. He was informed that he was next in line to become king. He left behind his job as a professor and returned to Ghana to care for his people. His sacrifice and willingness to serve demonstrates the seriousness of this tradition.

BYU nursing students learned some cultural signs of respect, such as waiting to speak until they were spoken to, giving gifts, and always shaking with the right hand.

The chief responded to the group’s requests with dignity and welcoming words. Our students had the privilege to learn more about another culture and connect with others on the opposite side of the world.

#LiveLikeFlo – Florence Nightingale’s 200th Birthday

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Check your spring 2020 college calendar for the above photo image, and send in photos holding it to be featured in the next edition of the college magazine!

By Quincey Taylor

The 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth is fast upon us. Her birthday – May 12, 1820 – was the beginning of an incredibly influential individual in the world’s history. In celebration, the college invites alumni and students to participate in the #LiveLikeFlo campaign. We want to see how YOU live like Flo.

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Students Electra Cochran, Emma Beaumont, and Harper Forsgren in London: #4 Visit the Nightingale Museum.

From now until mid-June 2020, friends of the college are asked to do the following:

  1. Cut out or photocopy Nightingale’s image included in the 2020 college calendar (pictured above).
  2. Bring the page and Bicentennial Adventure List with you on your journeys – near and far – in the coming months.
  3. Take a photo of yourself, your family, or your friends with the page in front of a corresponding scene from the list.
  4. Post your images on Facebook or Instagram using the hashtag #LiveLikeFlo including the scene number you are depicting. Using the hashtag allows us to find it. You can also email the photo to nursingpr@byu.edu if social media isn’t your thing.

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Dean Patricia Ravert: #7 Visit Egypt (Florence studied there).

Many of the scenes on the Adventure List can be done in your home, community, or workplace. Here is the Adventure List to help you start brainstorming for your submission:

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Many of the submitted images will be featured in the fall 2020 issue of the college magazine as well as in displays within the Spencer W. Kimball Tower. To be considered for inclusion in the fall magazine, entries must be received by June 15; otherwise, promotion ends August 23.

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Nursing student Ryan Bowman in Ecuador: #11 Visit a church of another religion.

How will you follow the example of Florence Nightingale and #LiveLikeFlo? We are excited to find out!

 

Everyone Has Something to Give: Kendall Semones

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Semones and her husband enjoy the beach together. Photo courtesy of Semones.

By Quincey Taylor

As a nurse, sometimes it’s the small moments that confirm to you that the path you’ve chosen is the correct one. The same goes for fifth semester student Kendall Semones, who strives for balance in a sometimes-hectic student life.

Her desire to join the medical field started when she got a job as a medical assistant in high school. Semones loved interacting with patients and helping individuals despite the oftentimes precarious position they are in. However, when it came to the medical procedures it was another story. On her first day, Semones passed out due to nerves. It was then that she questioned, “Is this the direction for me?”

However, after finding the why she had decided to try it out, everything became a lot easier. She says, “As I continued through that and working to focus on the patient, it helped to have a purpose and focusing only on that purpose.” She was able to work through the nerves and now looks forward to learning new medical procedures, “as long as they’re not on me,” Semones laughs.

Since getting into the program, Semones has loved learning nursing from a unique BYU gospel perspective. She is grateful for the spirit’s influence in her experiences, and says, “I think that the gospel instills a lot of confidence into my practice because I can go in knowing that I have extra help.”

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Semones (red, fifth from the right) attributes many life lessons learned to her time in Tonga. Photo courtesy of Shelly Reed.

This past summer, Semones was able to participate in the Tonga section of the clinical practicum for the public and global health nursing course. This was a life-changing moment for her. She remembers a particularly touching experience:

“I was on the pediatric floor and there was a patient who was getting a dressing change. He was just a little, little kid and the nurse was really focused on getting the dressing done. The boy was in so much pain and he was super terrified just because they had limited resources. So my friend and I decided to go over. I went over and I held the little boy’s hand and talked to him. Of course, he was still in pain, but you could definitely see in his face a certain level of comfort after that. It was just from being there with him. Even though my role wasn’t huge, I didn’t help participate in an important step of the procedure or wound care, it was still meaningful for him. It was a very meaningful moment for myself as well.”

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Semones and other nursing students enjoy performing in the BYU Luau, showing their love for the country of Tonga. Photo courtesy of Semones.

She walked away from her international experience knowing that, “Everyone has something to give. Whether that’s a nursing student, or a nurse with limited resources, or even a young patient, everyone has something to offer… They have special gifts or skills that they can share with others.”

As she has striven to achieve balance in her life, one thing Semones believes is that people are the most important. If she could give one piece of advice to herself when she entered the major, it would be that sacrificing human relationships just to have a better grade will never be worth it. She says, “It means if my friend calls me up and they’re having a bad day and they want to talk, they’re more important than an extra hour of studying for a test.”

 

Helping Babies Breathe: BYU Students in Fiji

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BYU nursing students crossed a river in Fiji to teach about the importance of helping babies breathe.

By Quincey Taylor

During the Fiji section of the clinical practicum for the public and global health nursing course this summer, associate professor Dr. Janelle Macintosh had the chance to teach locals how to help babies breathe. In life-threatening situations, these skills are critical considering they don’t have many of the modern medical luxuries we in the United States enjoy. According to the Health Newborn Network, 40 million women [annually] around the world give birth accompanied by their mothers, sisters, or aunties instead of trained health care providers who could intervene if complications arise. More than 2 million women give birth completely alone.

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NeoNatalie simulation manikin helps the students put into play what they’ve learned before the situation arises.

“Helping Babies Breathe” is a low fidelity simulation education that was created by the World Health Organization, the American Academy of Pediatricians, and around eight other global partners. It is a very structured education system that is meant for low-resource countries. The purpose is to teach healthcare providers what to do if someone gives birth and how to help that baby if it is having trouble.

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BYU nursing students interact with local Fijians, educating them on this important skill.

A few BYU nursing students, along with Macintosh, took the master training class at the University of Utah. Their goal was to disperse their knowledge to the nursing students and faculty in Fiji.

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Faculty were excited to learn, and eagerly participated in activities.

When Macintosh was asked how the locals reacted to the program, she said, “They loved it. They actually asked us if we would come back. So we are planning on going back this next year, with the hope that then we can just reinforce the teaching and that they can be self-sustaining.”

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This class, given to the hospital staff in Savusavu, was excited to put their skills to the test.

Utah Honor Flight: A Special Chance to Give Back

 

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Students posing in Washington DC. Photo courtesy of Landon.

By Corbin Smith

“Everyone has a story, and if you’re willing to hear it, it’ll bring you to your knees.”

 

That is a quote that teaching professor Dr. Kent Blad shared with the 18 students that accompanied him on the Utah Honor Flight last May. He spoke of the 50 veterans that traveled with our nursing students to Washington DC to participate in truly a life-changing experience.

Honor Flight is a non-profit organization founded in 2005. Since then it has grown into a nationwide organization, with chapters operating in 45 states in the US. The Utah chapter was formed in 2010, and starting in 2013 Utah began doing flights regularly. According to their website in 2018, Honor Flight has served 21,189 veterans while serving 222,133 nationwide.

Honor Flight allows war veterans to visit war memorials in Washington DC. During the trip, veterans are taken to various historical and memorial sites. They get a special tour of the Arlington National Cemetery and visit Fort McHenry. The highlight of the trip, though, is the Heroes Banquet, done to spotlight and honor the services and bravery of our veterans.

Today, thanks to the efforts of Blad, BYU and Utah Honor Flight have partnered to allow nursing students to act as “guardians”, or chaperones, to the veterans who participate in this trip. This has become an opportunity students can use for their clinical practicum of the public and global health nursing course in the spring.

This all started in 2014 when Dr. Blad realized that a connection could be made from the course he teaches on caring for the veteran patient and Utah Honor Flight. Blad felt strongly that allowing students to participate in the Honor Flight would be the best learning experience for each of them. “Instead of teaching our students out of a textbook, we have the veterans live and in color, teaching the students about themselves and telling stories from their war experiences and how it affects their lives. That is what really makes a difference,” he explains.

Blad was right. The Honor Flight impacted the lives of every student that attended. Each student was able to hear understand a little bit better the life of the veteran they served, and not one of them left without a touched heart.

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Landon (middle) says the Honor Flight changed her whole attitude on life! Photo courtesy of Landon.

Fifth-semester student, Amanda Landon, was one who was greatly impacted by the Honor Flight. She says, “My experience with the Honor Flight was in a word: incredible. It was amazing for me to see the degree to which they are gracious, humble, and loving. I saw it as a once-in-a-lifetime chance to give back in a small way to those who gave so much.”

Meanwhile, the Honor Flight was particularly special for Hannah Hoffman, another 5th semester student here at the college. For Hoffman, it was special because she was able to take her grandfather to the Honor Flight. “The coolest part for me about the Honor Flight was that I developed such a strong relationship with my grandpa. I saw another side of him I had never seen,” she says.

While spending time with her grandpa during the Honor Flight, Hoffman feels like she learned two major lessons that will help her progress as a nurse. First, that nursing is more than just caring about the physical health of your patients. She says, “The reality is that there was a lot to focus on with our veterans. There are spiritual, mental and emotional needs to meet on the trip. The priority was create a feeling of understanding and one of safety, where he could feel safe to share things that maybe he wouldn’t share with someone else, and know that he would be validated and that he would receive empathy and compassion.” That is the epitome of the Healer’s art!

Second, learn the stories of your patients. Not judging your patients is an important aspect of nursing and will affect greatly if they trust you or not. Hoffman explains, “The Honor Flight helped me see how to develop a strong nurse to patient relationship. It is easy to see the stubborn side of veterans, but during the Honor Flight I was able to see who they really are.”

The Honor Flight is an impactful experience each year for all who attend, especially for Blad, the bridge between the BYU College of Nursing and Utah Honor Flight. “I am constantly amazed by these men and women,” Blad says, “They help you gain a new perspective on life every year.”

Want to learn more about the Honor Flight, in only 60 seconds? Check out this video: https://youtu.be/KPHd4Tud-1c