Category Archives: Events

Help Celebrate the College of Nursing’s 65th Anniversary

 

To recognize the 65th anniversary of the Brigham Young University College of Nursing—established on September 29, 1952—we’re inviting all alumni and students to help celebrate. Since the influence of our program is known worldwide, we’re wondering, “Where will the college logo travel in the next few months?”

From now until September, we are asking our alums and students to do the following:

  1. Cut out/use the college logo from the 2017 college spring magazine (page 13) or print the image from above.
  2. Bring the logo with you on your journeys—near and far—this spring and summer.
  3. Take a photo of you, your family, or your friends with the logo in front of your favorite location.
  4. Post your images on Facebook or Instagram and use the hashtag #Ynursing52.

 

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Kaylee Hunsaker at National Institute of Health in Washington, DC

If you are not planning any trips, no need to worry. Snap an image in your backyard, community, or workplace. These photos will track all of the adventures and accomplishments of our alumni and students. We’re planning a display in the fall 2017 issue of the magazine, during Homecoming, and at the Scholarly Works Conference in October. To be considered for inclusion in the fall magazine, entries must be received by June 15; otherwise, photos are due September 15.

 

You don’t do social media? Email high-resolution photos (JPG file in original size) to nursingpr@byu.edu, or mail them to BYU College of Nursing, 65th Anniversary Celebration, 572 SWKT, Provo, UT 84602.

Let’s see how far our celebration can go! Who will take the logo with them? Stay tuned.

 

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Cory Paul (BS’17) in Antarctica 

 

The Magic Yarn Project and BYU Team Up to Make Wigs for Childhood Cancer Patients

Last Saturday in what turned out to be a landmark service project, over 400 people crowded the Wilkinson Center ballroom to create Disney-themed wigs for kids with cancer. The project, sponsored by The Magic Yarn Project and the BYU College of Nursing, was a massive success.

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The Magic Yarn Project co-founder Holly Christensen works with volunteers to prepare a Moana wig.

“I did not expect to have so many people show up,” Holly Christensen, a BYU College of Nursing alumna and co-founder of The Magic Yarn Project, says.

The Magic Yarn Project is a non-profit group started by Christensen in Alaska. It relies entirely on donors and volunteers to make the soft-yarn hairpieces, so the BYU event represented a huge increase in both productivity and publicity.

“We’ve never done a workshop this big,” she says. “I’m completely touched and overwhelmed by how many people came and it’s hard for me not to get too emotional thinking about it but it’s been awesome.”

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Volunteers make Moana-inspired wigs

During the course of the five-hour project, 185 wigs were made, with styles ranging from Elsa to Jack Sparrow to Rapunzel and other Disney-related characters. This was a record number for the Magic Yarn Project, and during the event, many participants were touched by the potential impact of their work.

“I really enjoyed this,” student Dhina Clement says. “I definitely felt like this was the most productive that I have ever been.”

Nursing student Jessica Wright agrees. “This is an awesome volunteer experience because you feel like what you’re doing is helping someone,” she says. “You can imagine having the wig on a little girl’s head and how happy she’ll be when she sees it.”

Students were not the only ones working—many members of the wider Utah Valley community arrived, oftentimes with large amounts of children in tow in order for many hands to make light work.

“I heard about this through a friend from work, and I thought it was just a great idea to come and just put my effort into it for any of the kids who need it,” says Esme Still, whose children worked beside her. In addition, five nursing professors were also present braiding and preparing wigs.

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The Wilkinson Center ballroom was completely full of volunteers. 185 wigs were made in the five-hour project.

Around half of the wigs made at this event will be given to patients at Primary Children’s Hospital, while others will be sent to patients in Louisiana and Arizona. The impacts of the project, however, extend also to the participants, who felt grateful to have been able to contribute to the event.

“I think it’s a really good opportunity to bring some joy to some people and it was really easy and fun and simple,” student Sam Smith says. “It’s nice to wake up on a Saturday morning and do something for someone else.”

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Anyone interested in future volunteer opportunities with The Magic Yarn Project should visit http://www.themagicyarnproject.com/.

Students Learn the Balancing Act at the “Struggle to Juggle” Conference

Yesterday, the BYU College of Nursing hosted its annual Professionalism Conference.  Students listened to speakers, attended breakout sessions on topics related to overcoming the rigors of nursing life, and met prospective employers.

“The thing that I like most about this is that I think it helps you be aware of the things that will be coming,” says capstone student Ashea Hanna, who is slated to graduate in April.

Others also gained a lot from the theme of the conference, which was “Struggle to Juggle.” Breakout topics ranged from healthy eating to handling compassion fatigue, while others treated financial independence and nursing ethics.

“It helped me learn how to balance a couple of things like sleep and self-care, but then also broaden my perspective a little,” fourth-semester student Micai Nethercott says.

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Capstone student McCall Van Leeuwen particularly enjoyed the breakout session held by a non-nursing professional, since it offered the chance to feel appreciated as a student nurse and become aware of her possible positive impact on others.

Meanwhile, back in the Garden Court over fifteen booths were set up with representatives from various hospitals and agencies proffering information to students about future job opportunities.

One such station was for Wyoming State Hospital, which is roughly 100 miles away. There a decorative poster highlighted the offered $29 per hour wage for new nursing graduates.

“We need nurses and [BYU’s program is] a great nursing program,” expressed one representative of the hospital when asked why they had come so far. This sentiment was common among vendors, many of whom had various open positions they hoped students could fill.

Jesse, a representative of Intermountain Healthcare’s Dixie Regional Medical Center, had several students express interest in working in St. George.

“We’ve had quite a few, and most of them are very excited,” he said. He and his colleagues liked that the conference brought students close to them and offered students different opportunities to seek employment with various groups at assorted places.

In the end, the conference managed to help students understand how to take care of themselves and their careers during future years, all while enjoying a free lunch.

“Overall, it’s just really good helping me understand the balance I need in my future career,” capstone student Bethany Borup says.

 

 

Dr. Stephanie L. Ferguson To Address Nursing College Event

 

This year’s annual Scholarly Works Conference brings a special treat for BYU nursing students: a chance to hear from the world-renowned nursing expert Dr. Stephanie L. Ferguson.

Dr. Ferguson has years of experience in the health industry. She founded and is president of a health-consulting firm that has clients all over the world. Her travels have seen her visit over 140 countries.

Her employers have included the World Health Organization and the White House. Leadership has been a defining character of her career, with positions including:

  • Elected member of the National Academy of Medicine/Institute of Medicine
  • Member of the Board of Trustees of the U.S. Catholic health Association
  • Director of the International Council of Nurses’ Leadership for Global Change Programme
  • Co-chair of the American Academy of Nursing’s Institute for Nursing Leadership
  • Director of the Washington Health Policy Institute in the Center for Health Policy, Research and Ethics
  • Director of the ICN-Burdett Global Nursing Leadership Institute, located in Switzerland

Dr. Ferguson’s topic is “Building and Sustaining Healthy Nations: Leading the Way Forward.” While registration for the conference is now closed, the college will provide information next week about Dr. Ferguson’s presentation, as well as about select breakout sessions.