Category Archives: College of Nursing Students

The Girl Who Loves Getting Sick

By Calvin Petersen

There’s a reason people say things like, “I’m going to avoid it like the plague!” Most people are worried, even terrified, of becoming sick. Most. Not Erin Ward. A student in her first semester of BYU’s nursing program, Erin actually looks forward to getting sick.

Erin told her classmates that getting strep throat was the best thing that happened over Christmas break at her home in Virginia Beach. “Everyone looked at me like I was really weird,” says Erin. “I love, love getting sick. And this is terrible, but I do, I love getting sick.”

To her, getting sick is the perfect excuse for Erin’s mom to make chicken noodle soup, bring her warm blankets and allow her a day of uninterrupted sleep. “I think it’s a really nice feeling. Everybody wants somebody to take care of them once in a while.” Understanding what it means to receive devoted care is just one reason why Erin feels at home in BYU’s College of Nursing.

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A 9th Grade Prophecy

Erin’s 9th grade chemistry teacher was the first to tell her that he thought she’d make a great nurse.  “That’s so sexist! You’re saying that because I’m a girl,” thought Erin, “I’m going to become a chemical engineer.” However, several chemistry classes later, she realized chemistry just wasn’t for her. Erin instead fell in love with volunteering at local hospitals where caring for patients took on a more spiritual aspect.

“I just really wanted to do what the Savior would be doing. And I thought ‘If the Savior could be anywhere, He would be administering unto the sick.’ So I started volunteering at hospitals. I was fourteen and then I kept going all the way through senior year in high school.” She became a certified nursing assistant (CNA) and worked at the hospital every summer, providing basic care to patients.

An Angel in the Cardiac Unit

During one of her volunteer shifts at the hospital, Erin took ice chips to a bed-bound woman in the cardiac unit. She stayed after her ice delivery to give the woman some company. At one point in their conversation, the woman smiled warmly at Erin and said reverently, “I see the light of Christ all around you. You glow like you are an angel.” Erin was moved by her words and was surprised to find out that the woman wasn’t LDS.

“That was an amazing experience,” says Erin. “That was probably the first time I realized that the little things really can make a difference. I just brought her ice chips and talked to her, which made an impression on her, and more importantly, made an impression on me.”

Erin West Portrait

Not only does Erin love getting sick, but she also loves the hospital. “People have terrible memories in the hospital and that makes me so sad because for me everything about the hospital is super positive. I even like the smell,” she says. Nursing is evidently the perfect career for her.

A Committed Nurse in Training

Even though Erin was offered a four-year, full-tuition scholarship and entrance to the honors nursing program as a freshman at the University of Utah, she decided to study nursing at BYU. Beginning the rigorous first semester of the program also meant she had to give up taking band class. “In high school, I was third in the state for French horn,” Erin recalls.

Additionally, she stepped down from her student government position for on-campus housing. And although she won’t have time for an American Sign Language (ASL) class either, Erin hopes to use her six years of experience signing on her upcoming LDS mission. To Erin, becoming a nurse means becoming more like the Savior, and that makes any sacrifice worth it.

“The Savior, ministers to the one and nursing is completely ministering to the one. I mean, taking time to bring water to someone or talking to somebody when you’re really busy, that’s ministering to the one. That’s why nurses do what they do, because of those little interactions. I think those little ‘You are an angel’ moments are what keep us going. I think that’s probably what would make the Savior very happy.”

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The Miracle of Birth

The Miracle of Birth

Ashley Dyer

The most spiritual experience I had this semester was the day I was able to see my first birth while completing OB and Pediatric nursing clinical rotations at the University of Utah and Primary Children’s Hospital .

That whole morning, I sat in front of a computer screen monitoring an unborn baby’s heart rate.  Every 15 minutes I would have to chart how he was doing – what his baseline heart rate was, if there were any abnormal decelerations, etc.

The time finally came for baby to be born. I was so excited. I had gotten to know baby’s family that morning. There were quite a few family members there who would be present during the birth and they were all so anxious and excited. Rather than just watching the birth, I stood at mom’s side, with my arm on her shoulder, helping her breathe and monitoring baby’s heart rate. It was intense, despite the fact that she had an epidural.

As I watched her concentrated face as she struggled to bear down and saw her exhaustion and relief each time she was allowed to rest, my heart went out to her. And then, after minutes of contractions that involved pushing and resting, the baby finally entered the world.  His first cry was emotional and precious. The second the mother heard it, she broke down crying. In turn I was suddenly overcome with so much emotion that I surprised myself when I started crying as well. I quickly reminded myself that I needed to be more professional and  hold back the tears that kept wanting to come out. The grandmother later came over and, with a smile on her face, told me she had seen the tears.  So much for trying to be professional.  But she seemed to think it was cute.

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As I have pondered on my experience with birth this Christmas season, my thoughts have naturally turned to the experience of Mary, who gave birth to the Savior of the world in a grotto filled with animals. After taking OB and seeing an actual birth, I have come to understand how miraculous the delivery of a baby really is. There are so many things that can go wrong, especially in a natural birth. Without pain medications to ease the experience, I can’t imagine how hard it must have been for Mary that special night.

I can, on the other hand, imagine how hard the Adversary was working to prevent this birth from happening. Yet Mary was faithful and willing to keep the commandments of God. Her response to the angel Gabriel’s announcement that she would bear the Son of God was, “Behold the handmaid of the Lord; be it unto me according to thy word” (Luke 1:38). How similar these words are to the words Mary’s son would later speak as He was about to do the most difficult thing He had ever done on earth: “Not as I will, but as thou wilt” (Matt. 26:39).

So when the time came for Mary to deliver her baby, her faith allowed her to follow the Lord’s command, despite the obstacles that were placed in her way. This handmaiden of the Lord was able to discover God’s will, develop faith in God’s will, submit to God’s will, and praise God for allowing her be a part of His will (Luke 1:46-55). And I can imagine that Mary’s unexpected sacrifice to give birth in an animal-filled cave and the suffering she went through during her birth experience must have been so worth it for her.

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Have you ever held a newborn baby? And watched it look up at you, somewhat confused as its eyes accustom to the bright lights? Have you seen the purity that seems to naturally radiate from its countenance?  And the innocence that can be so easily found in its beautiful newborn eyes? After this semester, I can finally say that I have. As I cared for the newborn baby boy I had watched enter the world that special day, I could not help but think about where he had come from and what he had been called to do here on earth. I could not help but conclude that he was truly a child of God who had divine potential. And I could not help but confirm to myself that the Plan of Salvation was true thanks to the birth and lifelong ministry of the Only Begotten Son of God. And with the apostles, this Christmas season, I too would like to rejoice and declare, “God be thanked for the matchless gift of His divine Son.”

Ashley Dyer is a fourth semester BYU nursing student. She was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan and grew up in Shanghai, China.

 

Caring for Those Who Need It Most

BYU Nursing student Emily Graham took a deep breath as she entered the surgical unit. As she inhaled, she looked at the operating table… and the blood. The patient in front of her had cut himself pretty badly. Wasting no time, Graham and the physician went to work, checking the wound for any foreign objects that might have gotten inside and placing sutures to close the wound. Once the sutures were finally placed and the wound had stopped seeping, Graham began gingerly wiping the blood off the patient. Every so often, her eyes strayed to the shackles that bound her orange jumpsuit-clad patient to the surgical table. This man had been through a lot, she thought to herself. She didn’t know anything about his past, and she didn’t need to, she reminded herself. At that moment, she was just glad to give him the care he needed.

Last spring, Graham was one of several students who participated in the At-Risk Populations clinicum for the Public and Global Health Nursing course, an experience that she and many of her fellow classmates say changed the way they view “The Healer’s Art.”

“The purpose of the course is to help students prepare to take care of patients that are vulnerable and are at more risk,” associate teaching professor Peggy Anderson explains. “The group that I teach gets to work with and serve populations that are at-risk here in the local area.”

Students enrolled in the course have the opportunity to work with patients from a wide range of backgrounds – from diabetes and disability clinic patients to inmates at adult and juvenile detention centers. Anderson says that nearly all of her students have an opportunity to volunteer for 8-10 hour shifts at either the Utah County Jail or the Utah State Prison.

“For most students, this is a cultural type experience, where they learn cultural humility,” Anderson explains. “The students learn how to care for someone without making judgments. Even though the inmate’s lifestyles may be different than the students’ lifestyles or their choices are different than what the students’ choices might be in life, the students learn to care for all of God’s children without judgment.”

“I think a lot of us are raised to think of prisoners and inmates as ‘bad people’ and that we shouldn’t associate with these individuals because they are ‘dangerous’,” Graham says. “However, I learned that many of these people are simply products of their environments, and that many of them lacked the love and opportunities I enjoyed as a child. Through learning about inmates and prison culture, I was able to see the good, the courage, and the strength many of these men possess, and also able to shake off my own prejudices and fears. I learned that everyone wants to feel loved, and everyone deserves love.”

“The inmates were really nice,” fellow student Annemarie Sudweeks adds. “I was a little scared at first because I didn’t know how they would interact. My first day was kind of weird for me, but the more I went, the more I felt comfortable interacting with them. You want to keep your distance, and keep those professional boundaries, but they’re human beings and they have feelings and you can tell that they have needs.”

During their time at the prison, students have the chance to serve inmates in a wide variety of circumstances. On any given day, students will perform physical assessments, administer and distribute medication, or change bandages for inmates.

For many students, the highlight of the course was a special musical fireside held at the women’s prison just before the end of the semester. Students shared their testimonies with many of the women they had served during their time at the prison.

“I really got to interact with the inmates in that setting more than in the clinical setting,” Sudweeks recalls. “It was cool just to see how much they want to do better and improve; you can see that they’re trying. It was reminder to me that they’re someone’s mom or daughter or grandmother and that they have a lot of potential.”

While reflecting on the impact of this course, one student wrote, “Throughout my experience I’ve been thinking about Jesus Christ and wondering about His culture. The more I look around in the world, the more I see that He does not subscribe to a single culture. When He was resurrected, He appeared to people of different cultures and He perfectly connected with people in each and every one. I could feel His love and influence as I worked with children with special healthcare needs and with inmates. I now know that Jesus’ art of healing can come to me as I attempt to understand where people are coming from. I can never perfectly understand anyone’s situation, but I know that as I try to love someone as the Savior would, the barriers of culture will crumble and I can truly connect and help people.”

 

 

 

Strong Character and Values Are Just as Important as Knowledge

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Whether nursing students are learning about safe patient handling, isolation precautions, or bowel elimination, there is always something that I have learned that applies to building my character as I continue in my career of becoming a nurse. This has taught that no matter what we learn, the true point is to shape our character to provide the best care possible.

The idea of strengthening values and building character also influenced my actions in my clinical experience [last] semester. I had the opportunity to work at a nursing home and dealt with many patients who had a variety of health problems.

One week, I was working with a patient. (I’ll call her Katie.) I was nervous to work with this patient as a new student nurse. Not only did she suffer from hemiplegia and paraplegia, which severely limited her movement, she also could not speak.

She had suffered a stroke a few years back and had lost her ability to talk. Her only speech was three nonsensical syllables that she would say over and over again. She communicated by the tone of her voice saying those syllables and by moving the one arm that she still had control over.

Nothing in nursing school had prepared me for this. How was I supposed to help someone that could not even express to me what she needed? I spent over an hour looking for her glasses that first day. She became upset with me, and I left at the end of the day feeling extremely frustrated.

That weekend I completed my mid-semester evaluation where one of the categories was evaluating my caring ability. I rated myself on how I met my client’s biopsychosocial needs in a caring and compassionate manner. I knew this was something I needed to improve and I remembered back to my N295 Fundamentals class, where the professor would explain that the important lesson was not just the knowledge that we learned but how it contributed to our character and values.

I went to the care center the following week with a renewed resolve on how to care for my patient.

Since this was the second week caring for Katie, I knew more of her daily routine. I was able to get her ready for breakfast, but we arrived 20 minutes early, and preparation for breakfast was underway.

I saw a piano in the room and asked if she had ever played the piano. She nodded that she had, and then motioned to ask me if I knew how to play. I responded in the affirmative and she pointed at me again to go to the piano as if she wanted me to play.

I knew accompaniment was not in the scope of my duties as a student nurse. However I had promised myself to do all that I could to care for her, so I sat down at the piano. The only book on the piano was an LDS hymnal; I knew she was LDS, so I started playing for her.

The amazing thing was that even though she could not speak, the stroke did not affect the area of her brain that dealt with singing. She sang the notes of the melody to every song I played. I have never seen someone happier than Katie at that moment. For a brief time, I even had the whole room singing a hymn with me.

When finished, even though she could not fully express it, I knew she was thankful that I played the piano. I appreciate the opportunity to go out of my comfort zone and do my best to be sensitive to Katie’s needs, even though what I did was not a normal nursing duty.

The next week at the care center I found out that Katie had passed away. I am thankful that I took the advice of my professor and worked attentively to meet Katie’s needs and lift her spirits. I am blessed to know that in her final days, I was able to provide the best care possible.

Winner of the college’s annual essay contest, Claire Hunsaker is a third-semester nursing student from El Dorado Hills, California.

College Begins Recognition of DAISY Honorees

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Sage Williams (left), Dean Patty Ravert, and Julie Valentine.

The BYU College of Nursing has partnered with the DAISY Foundation to begin a new tradition and recognize an extraordinary nursing faculty and student each semester. Last October we were pleased to recognize assistant professor Dr. Julie Valentine with the first DAISY Faculty Award and Sage Williams as the DAISY In Training Award recipient.

The DAISY Foundation (an acronym for Diseases Attacking the Immune System) was established in 1999 by the family of Patrick Barnes, as a way to honor him after he died of complications of the auto-immune disease ITP. Pat’s family created the DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses to honor registered nurses who make a difference in the lives of patients and families experiences in healthcare (some of our alumni have received this distinction).

The DAISY Faculty Award provides national recognition and appreciation to nursing faculty for their commitment and inspirational influence on their students. The DAISY Student In Training Award is designed to remind students, even on their toughest days in nursing school, why they want to be a nurse.

Each January and September, the College of Nursing will accept nominations at nursing.byu.edu of a nursing professor or student that reflects compassion and exemplifies the Healer’s art. Recognition occurs at the college’s professionalism conference in February and the scholarly works and contribution to the discipline conference in October.

DAISY Faculty Award

CMH01731-1Julie Valentine is an assistant professor and also a certified adult/adolescent sexual assault nurse. Dr. Valentine focuses on multidisciplinary, collaborative research studies uniting disciplines in sexual assault case reform to benefit victims and case processing. In 2015 she was the primary author of two grants totaling $3.2 million for the testing of previously untested sexual assault kits and the resulting investigation and prosecution of these rape cases in Utah.

She is engaged in a collaborative research project with the Utah state crime laboratory exploring the impact of new DNA testing methods in sexual assault cases, and a collaborative law enforcement study on trauma-informed victim interviewing in sexual assault cases. From 2014 to 2017, she served on the Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence Reporting committee with the National Institute of Justice developing national best practice policies in sexual assault cases.

In 2016 Dr. Valentine served on the BYU Advisory Council on Campus Response to Sexual Misconduct which investigated Title IX implementation and recommended substantial policy and structural changes. As a mother of eight children and two grandchildren, Julie is an influential teacher wherever she goes. Whether at the lectern, hospital, courtroom, legislative floor, church or home, she shows love, compassion, and a kind listening ear with everyone.

Of interest, her favorite holiday is Valentine’s day, when her family sends our Valentine cards and enjoys making dozens of yummy treats to share with neighbors, friends, and co-workers.

DAISY In Training Award

CMH01733-2Sage Williams (BS ’17) became a research assistant at the end of nursing semester one, working with faculty members Dr. Julie Valentine, Dr. Linda Mabey, and Dr. Leslie Miles on multiple research studies on sexual assault victims throughout Utah. Her passion for caring for underserved and vulnerable individuals expands beyond the research arena to immersing herself in volunteer work.

She takes a monthly 48-hour call as a victim’s advocate in Utah County for sexual assault victims with Center for Women and Children in Crisis, volunteers at the University of Utah Health Burn Camp program for children, and worked this past summer in a family refugee camp in Greece for children and families fleeing Syria. Of note, she left the camp to join faculty members in Dublin, Ireland to present at the International Sigma Theta Tau conference. While there, Sage only had sandals to wear because she had given her shoes to those more in need at the refugee camp.

Her plans include obtaining a DNP as a psychiatric mental health nurse. She is truly an exceptional nursing student who emulates the Healer’s art and will make a difference in the world, especially with those who have been traumatized.

Blood, Sweat, and Tears: What Happens When Nursing Meets Rugby

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Nursing student Ali Smith goes in for a hard tackle during a BYU Women’s Rugby match against University of California

For four and a half years, Ali Smith lived what some people might call a double life. By day, Smith was a smiling, gentle-mannered nursing student in one of the most demanding academic programs at BYU. Few would have guessed that by nightfall, Smith’s smiling face would be covered in the blood, sweat, and tears of one of BYU’s most aggressive contact sports.

Smith has been a member of the BYU Women’s Rugby team ever since her very first semester at BYU; a journey that transformed her from an inexperienced benchwarmer to veteran starter in a National Title game. Now a capstone student in the nursing program, Smith has had to take a step away from the rugby pitch to focus on her clinicals. However, she says that the lessons she learned from rugby have helped her become a better nurse.

Smith first joined the BYU Women’s Rugby team as a freshman — long before she submitted her application to the nursing program. Although she had never played rugby before, Smith quickly fell in love with the sport.

“Rugby is a very physical game, but it’s also a very mental game. There are days in practice where you can get really beat up and you’ll ask yourself “Why am I doing this?” You just got beat up for two hours and now you have to go home and do homework for the next three hours! But I really wanted to become better and be the best; whether it was perfecting my pass or perfecting my tackling form. And it was totally worth it!”

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Ali Smith sprints for a try. A try is the rugby equivalent of a touchdown in football.

Starting in late September and going through the month of May, the BYU Women’s Rugby team practices for 2+ hours every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. This is in addition to strength and conditioning sessions (every Tuesday and Thursday) and games on Saturdays. Despite this huge time commitment, Smith says it wasn’t uncommon for her to stay late after practice to work on passing or kicking with her teammates.

“I love the team dynamic of rugby,” Smith shares. “It’s such a neat experience when you’re able to get into a groove with the people you’re playing with; making good passes and making plays happen. You just get the sense that you’re part of something that’s bigger than you.”

After several semesters on the rugby team, Smith decided to expand her horizons even further. She applied, and was accepted, to the BYU College of Nursing. Suddenly Smith’s already busy schedule became much more demanding.

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Ali Smith with her Nursing peers at the Intermountain Healthcare Complex

“It never felt like I was ‘done’,” Smith explains. “I was constantly doing something. If I wasn’t studying for a test, I was thinking about a play I could use on the field. If I wasn’t in class or doing homework, I was on a run or on the pitch.”

But having a crazy schedule did have its benefits. Between strength training, midterms, practices, and clinicals, Smith says she developed excellent time management skills.

“When I was in class, I was focused on that class. When I was in rugby, I was focused on playing rugby. I didn’t have extra time in my day to practice rugby or give to my classes, so I needed to make every moment count. Most days I didn’t have 5 hours to study for a test; I only had 2-3 hours before I had to go to practice. But for me, that extra focus was a huge blessing because it helped me get everything done and be more productive. It helped me develop self-discipline; I couldn’t just put off my homework till later because I knew I wouldn’t have that time.”

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Once Smith entered the nursing program, she noticed that many of the principles she learned on the rugby pitch could also help her on the hospital floor.

“On the rugby team, I learned to be very encouraging and complimentary towards my teammates; especially when they performed well. They need to know that I’m there for them.”

“Sometimes you are in a game where the player who plays your position on the opposing team is really, really good, and you’re just having an off day,” Smith explains. “But because you have a team, they can help make up for what you’re lacking. I’ve seen that a lot in the hospital. There have been days where things have gotten really crazy and you think “There’s no way I can get to both of these patients at the same time” and just then another nurse will offer to help get meds for your patient. That really makes a huge difference. When you’re on a team, sometimes you can only do so much, but because you have that team dynamic things can still run as smoothly and efficiently as possible.”

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Ali Smith and her teammates, prior to a BYU Women’s Rugby match

This team dynamic is part of what makes the BYU Women’s Rugby team one of the top programs in the nation. The team has only lost three home games in ten years of collegiate competition. Last May, they won a tough semi-final match to earn a place in the National Championship Title game against the 10-time defending champions.

“I felt a lot of pressure walking onto the pitch of that national championship game,” Smith reflects. “I never thought that I would get there or be that good. But our team performed really well. And even though we didn’t win the match, it was still a whirlwind of an experience. To play in that game and represent BYU in that national title game was such an honor.”

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The BYU Women’s Rugby team after the 2016 National Championship match. BYU placed second in the tournament, after suffering a narrow loss to Penn State, 15-5.

Even though Smith may not have another chance to represent BYU on the rugby pitch, she says she’s extremely grateful for the experience and how it’s impacted her future nursing career.

“In a hospital, sometimes people are in critical condition counting under you to perform in really stressful, high-pressure situations. So just like how in rugby you train so we can play in those high-level games; in nursing we learn and gain skills and become good at what we do so that in that moment when someone needs you, you’re ready for it and you’re able to perform under pressure. I think that having experienced that on the rugby pitch, I’m better prepared to handle whatever stressful situation I may encounter as a nurse.”

 

From Fighting Forest Fires to Working Clinicals: Michael Scott’s Story

When entering a burning building, remember that the hose is your lifeline. Crawl while advancing hand-on-hand or else you could twist the hose and get lost. When Chief says get out, you get out because the building could be about to collapse.

Such as some of the memories of nursing student Michael Scott’s time as a firefighter in New Hampshire. The job brought a mix of excitement and pressure, all of which helped Scott in his journey to studying nursing at BYU.

Starting first as a volunteer firefighter in high school, Scott realized how much he enjoyed the team atmosphere and the inherent service to the community that the job entailed. Each week offered plenty of opportunities to get the adrenaline flowing while responding to a variety of calls.

“I loved it,” he says. “I think it depends on your personality. I liked getting woken up in the middle of the night, and it was exciting to head to the scene or head to the engine.”

Scott became a certified firefighter and dedicated the next five years to the profession. The lifestyle was one in which everything could change in the blink of an eye.

“I’m not sure what a normal day would be because all calls are so different,” he says. “We were trained to be able to get all of our gear on in a minute. It was fun. You were really relaxed one minute, and the next minute you were sprinting, putting your clothes on, and heading out.”

Not everything was exactly what he had pictured.

“When I joined, I’d always pictured fires,” he says. “But most of the calls I got were for motor vehicle collisions and suicides.”

Scott found that he liked responding to many of the medical emergencies; he soon became certified as a firefighter EMT and worked closely with injured victims.

“The medical calls required a little bit more of me in general; I couldn’t just be in autopilot,” he says. “I actually liked that—I liked going to those calls and doing my best to help out and to make the people there feel important.”

As much as he enjoyed working as an EMT, something continued to trouble him.

“One of the things I noticed is that we would have repeat patients for cardiac arrest and other issues that are fixed by education, but as EMTs we don’t get to do that,” he says. “I’d always go home and I wished that I’d had a little bit more time to try to help that patient.”

During his EMT training, he had watched nurses in a local hospital. The nurses’ ability to help patients make productive health decisions and analyze their lifestyles affected him deeply.

“That’s what I really felt like saved the patient,” he says. “[EMTs] brought them back, but a lot of those patients just died later just because they didn’t make changes they needed to make. The things that the nurses would teach them those made a real difference. I liked that.”

Wanting to be more involved in helping patients prevent future health problems, Scott decided to study healthcare at BYU, eventually gravitating to nursing.

One thing he enjoys about BYU’s atmosphere is the Gospel-oriented atmosphere, particularly in the Nursing College.

On a few occasions at the firehouse, coworkers ribbed Scott for holding to his standards. He remembers that shortly thereafter the team responded to a devastating car accident in which a teenager had been thrown through the windshield. Scott had worked to stabilize the youth’s head, which was bent at an unnatural angel.

The team tried to load the teen on a backboard, but he adamantly refused to be strapped down. Realizing the extreme danger that the teenager was in, Scott tried explaining to him that even though his movement would be limited, the restraints would keep him from becoming permanently paralyzed. In that moment, he had some important realizations that influenced why he came to BYU.

“In healthcare and in eternity, living within certain restrictions can mean we trade a few moments of restraint for a lifetime of mobility,” he says. “The Brigham Young University nursing program includes principles for eternity in caring for people in a mortal state.”

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Fast forward to the present. Scott is a successful student and a proud father. As a student nurse, he is learning the skills that he saw nurses use to help patients back in New Hampshire, and he is excited to make a difference in the lives of others.

“The most traumatic part of being an EMT was when we weren’t able to save someone and having family watching and basically trying to figure out if we’re going to be able to save their family member,” he says. “As a nurse, I’ll have the opportunity to intervene a lot of times before that point. I’ll be able to decrease the number of goodbyes that family members have to make to their loved ones.”