Category Archives: College of Nursing Staff

Fall 2019 DAISY Award Winners Announced!

The College of Nursing at Brigham Young University continues to partner with the DAISY Foundation to recognize nursing professors and students who show extraordinary compassion. After the death of Patrick Barnes at the age of 33 from complications of an autoimmune disease, the Barnes family decided to do something positive to honor him. They established DAISY—an acronym for diseases attacking the immune system—to thank the nurses who cared for him and to recognize exceptional nurses around the world.

The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nursing Students

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Noel (middle) with Dean Ravert and her husband, Hamilton

The College of Nursing announced that it’s student award, The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nursing Students, went to Allison Bingham Noel.

Alli was nominated by her peer Keeley Austin, who writes: “Any person who meets Alli knows she is a special person. She has an infectious positive attitude and a laugh that makes everyone smile. I attended my global health clinical practicum with Alli in Fiji, and every day I became more impressed with her ability to connect with others. She became a role model for me as she found the ones who were in need and addressed those needs with her talents.

For example, we were assigned to teach a group of third-grade Fijian students about the human body. Many of our activities required the children to jump, run, and dance, and we did not account for any children who might have disabilities. When we started the lessons, I saw Alli sitting at the back of the group with a student in a wheelchair. She was attentive and helped that student participate in ways that were adjusted to meet his needs. I couldn’t believe how quickly she was able to assess the situation and find a solution. She constantly looks outward, so when she is faced with situations like this one, she adapts well. I know I can be the kind of nurse that doesn’t just go through the motions or goes according to plan. I will achieve this by following Alli’s example of compassion and seek out and address individuals’ needs.”

The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nursing Faculty

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Hunsaker (second from the left) with Dean Ravert and her family. 

The College of Nursing was also pleased to honor associate teaching professor Stacie Hunsaker with The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nursing Faculty.

Stacie received entries from several students, each one showing her level of compassion in nursing.

Hannah Hoffman writes, “I spent time with Stacie during a veteran clinical practicum. One Sunday while in Washington, D.C., an older woman fell leaving the church building and twisted her ankle. Stacie first addressed the immediate medical concern but then took time to listen to the women’s concerns, calm her fears, and ease her anxiety.”

Another nomination says, “I had only been in Stacie’s class for three weeks when I was admitted to the hospital. Stacie took time out of her extremely busy schedule to come and visit me. It meant the world to me. The care, concern, and compassion Stacie has for individuals are exemplary and beyond admirable!”

An additional student shares, “Stacie goes above and beyond to help those around her thrive. She took the time to tell me my strengths and applaud me, helping me to feel confident at a time that I was struggling to feel competent. She shared experiences from when she was a young nurse, and then laugh! The situation helped me realize that we could laugh at mistakes and the things we were stressing.”

Emily Henstrom says, “During third-semester, Stacie would set lunchtime for her clinical group, not because she had to, but because she wanted to spend those moments with us and get to know us. She has shown me so much love since I met her, and I can’t imagine my college experience without her.”

Both Hunsaker and Noel were presented with a unique sculpture as a symbol of their recognition. The small wooden token is called “A Healer’s Touch.” Each piece is hand-carved by members of the Shona Tribe in Zimbabwe.

Each semester, the College of Nursing opens nominations for additional DAISY Faculty and Nursing Student Awards. The call for submissions is your opportunity to nominate someone that reflects compassion and is an example of the Healer’s art.

 

5 Reasons (Or More) to Take N320 Online

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By Corbin Smith

In times past it has been said that nursing courses must be taken in-person to make the greatest impact and maximize learning. Many say that online nursing courses limit a student’s ability to connect with patients and receive quality training and practice. Critics even go far enough to say that nursing courses online don’t prepare students for the real world.

In the face of doubters, the BYU College of Nursing has recently begun to challenge that mindset, by creating a unique online and in-person course for students to take. This effort has been spearheaded by associate professor Dr. Janelle Macintosh. Along with Macintosh, assistant professor Dr. Neil Peterson and assistant teaching professor Dr. Denise Cummins are teaching the hybrid N320 course this semester.

The N320 hybrid class has been a great success, allowing students to learn in a new and flexible way. Soon, all sections of this class will be a both online and in-person. With that in mind and as registration for the winter semester approaches, Macintosh shares with you her 5 reasons why the N320 has been so successful, and how taking it can be beneficial for you!

 

  1. It’s Required! Well, this is obvious! For those of you who are going into your third-semester, this class is required for you to take. In this course you will receive valuable training on the research process in nursing, learn how to identify clinical problems and how to write and communicate effectively in the profession. You will even be able to knock out a GE in the process (after taking N339, too!)
  2. Flexibility with Clinicals – Clinicals can be very stressful, especially in 3rd semester when you have your first 12-hour shift in the hospital to go along with your other classes. By taking a hybrid class like N320, the time commitment to be in class is much less, allowing for more time for homework and clinicals!
  3. Work ahead! – In N320, the student has a lot of control over when to do assignments. Like any other class there are due dates to meet and assignments to complete, but the online set-up allows students to work ahead and do assignments, normally due 3 or 4 weeks in the future. With this course, you can easily take control over your learning!
  4. 1 on 1 Consultations – There are tons of benefits of being able to work with a teacher or professor one-on-one. Teaching can be more personally tailored to the student while students can feel comfortable and safe expressing confusions without worrying about what other students think. Not only is learning enhanced and content mastered more quickly, you can also build strong relationships with your professor that you wouldn’t normally get in a classroom.
  5. Comfort! – Wouldn’t you love to have class in bed while you’re in your pajamas? Professor Macintosh hopes that this format can give comfort to the already-stressed student. “College can be pretty tough and demanding,” she says, “we hope this individualized approach can help ease the strain of everyday college life.”

Now, the final reason, which may not come from Macintosh, but is true nonetheless.

  1. Take a Class from Some Wonderful Professors! – Professors Cummins, Macintosh and Peterson are all wonderful! All of the professors are student-oriented and want you to succeed. Macintosh says “The reason I teach is because I love the students and being able to engage with them.” This upcoming semester the course will be taught by Macintosh and assistant professor Dr. Marc-Aurel Martial! Don’t miss out on an opportunity to learn from them! You won’t regret it!

 

 

“There Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”

By Corbin Smith

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Tanner is so excited about her first semester at BYU!

As a society, we are captivated by people who don’t let physical limitations control and define their lives. We love hearing about those who don’t accept “you can’t do that” as a valid excuse. Influential figures like President Roosevelt and Stephen Hawking were confined to a wheelchair during their public lives, but did that ever stop them? Never. One of the coolest parts about being a nurse is that you are always surrounded by amazing people that have their own tough yet inspiring circumstances. New BYU College of Nursing faculty member, assistant professor Dr. Corinna Tanner, has dedicated her life to serving this demographic, a group that is especially close to her heart.

As a young girl, Tanner lived a relatively normal life. She went to school and played with her friends, just as any young girl would do. She lived with a small vision impairment, but when she was 14 years old, that impairment began to affect her a lot more. “We had to go to the medical specialists and figure out what it was. It wasn’t that I just needed glasses, I had another type of an eye problem,” Tanner remembers.

As it turns out, Tanner was diagnosed with Stargardt disease, a genetic disease that causes progressive damage to the macula, the area of the eye that is responsible for straight-ahead vision. This means that those with Stargardt disease can only see out of their peripheral vision.

Tanner is the first to admit that growing up wasn’t easy. “I had to put a lot of energy into the things I did,” she says, “I wasn’t able to do reading and math and other school subjects the way that other kids did, so I just had to work harder.”

Even with her eyesight worsening as time went on, Tanner was able to find her niche. She learned how to play the violin purely by ear and also pursued dance. In fact, when Tanner came to BYU as an undergraduate student, her original major was dance!

It wasn’t until later that Tanner found nursing. Years later she became a single mother who needed to provide for 3 kids. In that circumstance, she looked into what a possible nursing career could bring. “I thought there would be so many opportunities in nursing, because I could see nurses doing things that I could imagine myself doing, in spite of my vision impairment,” she says, “What I didn’t expect was that I would be able to develop a specialty helping the blind, and I could use my own life experience to help others.”

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Tanner loves this painting of Christ healing a blind man. She tries to emulate Christ’s love each day.

By taking 24 credits a semester, Tanner was able to complete two bachelor degrees and a master’s degree in 5 years! One was a Bachelor of Science in Health Science from Metropolitan State University and the other was a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Colorado, while adding a Masters in Nursing from the same university. She then went on to receive a Ph.D. from the University of Utah.

Getting her degrees was not easy, especially with 3 kids at home and vision impairment, but she never let any of it stop her. At school, she used special instruments that allowed her to do the same things her classmates were doing. Meanwhile at home, she dedicated the weekends to her family so she could support her children however she could, and she continues that to this day!

With her university training and expertise, Tanner has worked constantly to help those who suffer from vision loss. Prior to coming to BYU as a professor, she worked as a health educator at the John A. Moran Eye Center and the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City. She still teaches a vision loss orientation seminar there and offers those who are new to blindness various tricks, tips, and resources to use their remaining vision optimally.

She also takes her knowledge and skills abroad, to help visually impaired communities outside of the US live fulfilling lives. Among her many volunteer efforts, in the past, she has worked with LDS charities in Barbados, which she plans on continuing soon.

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Tanner has already done so much for the blind community, but she doesn’t plan to slow down any time soon. She knows that she can bring a special perspective that can help others overcome trials in their life. She explains, “I have a great career in nursing, not, despite my blindness, like I thought, but because of my blindness.”

Tanner has since re-married and now has a little 5-year old to keep her and her husband company at home. She enjoys going to concerts, traveling with her family and keeping a small garden.

 

 

 

Stroke Awareness Month: An Unlikely Hero

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Zak Gowans is happy that his dad, Ben, successfully survived a stroke. 

By Corbin Smith

There are very few things that can happen in a person’s life that can flip it completely upside down. Receiving a cancer diagnosis or the death of a loved one are just two examples. There is one, though, that many do not realize affects so many people each day.

Due to this fact, each May the world celebrates Stroke Awareness Month, reminding us the importance of being able to recognize and react to a stroke.

In 2016, strokes were the second leading cause of death in the world, amounting to almost 6 million deaths worldwide. Next month, some 65,000 Americans will experience a stroke; most unaware they are even at risk!

Since it is close to impossible to know when a stroke will strike, the National Stroke Association has created an easy-to-remember acronym called F.A.S.T to help identify the symptoms of a stroke. By knowing and quickly following F.A.S.T when you suspect someone is having a stroke, you could literally save someone’s life.

An Unlikely Hero

March 23, 2019 started as a normal day for Ben and Zak Gowans. Zak, the videographer for the College of Nursing’s media team, was spending some time doing homework in his room. His dad, Ben, having spent the day at his parents’ home, had just sat down on his bed to watch Avengers: Infinity War.

After a few minutes, wanting a break from homework, Zak came into the room and sat down on the bed to watch the movie with his dad. “The way we were laying, we couldn’t see each other. Then he sat up and looked at me. I saw his pupils were huge and he looked really confused. All I could ask was, ‘Are you okay?’” says Zak.

From Ben’s perspective he says, “I remember sitting there and thinking ‘I’ve seen this movie before but it doesn’t make sense what’s happening.’ I looked at my hands, and they were like someone else’s hands. They were moving oddly, not responding quite right, so I sat up a little and looked over at Zak.”

Zak jumped up, turned the movie off and ran over to the other side of the bed. “He couldn’t speak. I knew it was something with his brain, because he was acting very strange,” says Zak. “As I called 911,” Zak laughs, “My dad even started shaking his head no.” “It was because it was going to be expensive,” jokes Ben.

Within the next ten minutes, the paramedics arrived and Ben’s wife got back home from the grocery store to a great surprise. From the moment they arrived to when he made it to the hospital, he was bombarded with questions. “Every question they asked I knew the answer too, but the words wouldn’t come out of my mouth. I knew what to say but I couldn’t communicate it,” says Ben.

Stroke of Luck

The next few hours were filled with uncertainty and medical tests. He was given a CT scan to see what type of stroke he was having and where the blood clot was in his brain. He was offered a potentially dangerous clot-busting medicine to begin dissolving the clots.

After that, the emotional trial began. “I remember the first night. I was in a dark room and I couldn’t fall asleep. I remember laying there thinking that I wish I had just died. This was going to be a terrible life, and I didn’t want to do that. I just wished I had bled out,” says Ben.

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Ben was comforted by his family on his way to recovery.

He had a long line of people rooting for him, though, not letting him give up. His wife, Julie, stayed with him all night in the ICU and told him, “I’m not done with you, you can’t leave yet.” The next morning a steady stream of family members and neighbors from the community came in and helped strengthen him.

Ben amazed doctors and physical therapists by how quickly he regained his movement. On the other hand, they were puzzled with how a healthy 45-year-old man had suffered a stroke. Through some tests, they found an 8-millimeter hole in his heart, where a tiny clot had gotten through and shot straight up to his brain, causing the stroke.

After an operation to close the small hole, Ben is living a fairly normal and healthy life. He now laughs about the experience saying, “We joke about it all the time, it’s just good times. I don’t want to be sensitive about it, that’s just my personality.” Even in the face of hardship, Ben lives his life with a smile on his face.

Ben is very thankful to the nurses he had at Mountain View Hospital in Payson, Utah. “They lifted my spirits quite a bit and they were also very attentive,” he says. He is especially thankful, though, for the swift reaction of Zak. “I’m very fortunate that Zak was able to recognize the symptoms,” he says. Who knows if he would be here today without Zak’s actions?

Although Zak is not a nursing or medical student, he was able to save a life by simply knowing stroke symptoms and how to react. A stroke can hit in any moment, and it is important that we also know what to do, in case we need to become a hero in an instant.

 

Follow the link below to learn more about the risks as well as how to recognize and react to a stroke.

https://www.stroke.org/

Sharing EHR with the World

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Photo courtesy of the HPSN World website

By Corbin Smith

One of the greatest opportunities a university faculty member can have is to receive funding that allows them to give a presentation at an academic conference. Yes, you read that right. Paid travel to go give a presentation. That is exactly what happened to two of our faculty members: assistant teaching professor Stacie Hunsaker and simulation operations supervisor Kristen Whipple. Last February, MedAffinity, a company that provides electronic heath records software and is the software used by the BYU College of Nursing, sent both Hunsaker and Whipple to the Human Patient Simulation Network (HPSN) World conference in Orlando, Florida to present on BYU’s success using EHR systems in the classroom.

Since the fall of 2016, the BYU College of Nursing has incorporated EHR software for the nursing students in semesters one through five and for graduate students in year one. As students complete labs and assignments, they input what they did into the EHR system. The labs that the students do can be reset after each lab, so students can have the same opportunity to complete the scenario. The flexibility that MedAffinity’s software provides is what helps BYU’s EHR system be so successful compared to other schools.

Many other universities have been wary about using EHR systems due to the difficulty to make it work properly and efficiently. Due to its persistence and patience, the college has shown that it can be done. “That’s what we were trying to do,” Whipple says of her purpose at the conference, “to tell people that it’s doable…and the things that we did could be done with any program.”

One aspect presented by Hunsaker and Whipple at the conference was an orientation implemented by the college. The orientation done by Whipple to students is “another big thing that changed our experience” she says. While nursing students are in their first semester, Whipple and her team of TAs go in and teach them how to input data and save their progress so each student can hit the ground running from day one. This has gone a long way in helping students effectively operate the software.

Over the last few years, university teaching of nursing has quickly turned to the realm of patient simulation and electronic health records, with the BYU College of Nursing leading the way. Hunsaker and Whipple are adamant that these programs will better prepare future nurses for their careers, and thanks to their work to motivate other universities to employ this new technology, the world of nursing is well on its way.

Nursing Staff and Administration Receive SAERA Awards

Photo courtesy of BYU Human Resources

By Jessica Tanner

Three of our incredible staff and administration have recently been recipients of the Staff and Administrative Employee Recognition (SAERA) Award: Kathy Whitenight, Cherie Top, and Cara Wiley. These amazing women have displayed levels of continual learning, innovation, and care that have improved the College of Nursing and BYU. The University-sponsored SAERA Award recognizes those who have shown competency, respect for sacred resources, integrity, teamwork, exceeding customer expectation, respect for all individuals, innovation and accountability. These women have definitely achieved that.

Kathy Whitenight

Kathy Whitenight

Competency: Striving for excellence and sharpening skills on a continuous basis, 2018.

“As an assistant dean, Kathy Whitenight is essential to the workings of the college of Nursing,” writes Dean Patricia Ravert, who nominated her for the award in 2018. On receiving the award Whitenight reports, “I know when other people are getting the awards but I had no idea I was submitted. So it was a big surprise and really an honor to get it.”

There were several reasons why Dean Ravert nominated Whitenight in the competency category. Whitenight has kept up with legal matters, managed updates in physical facilities, and overseen human resources.  Another major department she oversees is Risk Management, where she helps students get the care they need in case of incident or injury. In this duty, Whitenight demonstrates personal care to each student. “They have my cellphone; they can call me 24/7,” she explains. “I’ve only gotten one call in the last year at 3:00 a.m. but I want them to that. I’d rather have them do that than not get the care they need and the financial coverage.” Whitenight keeps up on policies and procedures to help students avoid potential problems.

On Whitenight’s wall hangs James C. Christensen’s painting The Widow’s Might. “I have this picture on the wall,” she explains, “because…most of the things [we do] are done through tithing dollars. And that’s the widow’s mite.” Working with finances, Whitenight handles sacred resources with great care and respect.

Whitenight has to learn continually to keep up with technology and policies. “Each day something new could come in that I’ve never experienced before. And that’s what makes it exciting.”

Cherie Top

Cherie Top:

Exceeding Service Expectations: Serving the needs of others beyond what is expected, 2018

Cherie Top, the Graduate Program and Research Secretary, was awarded for exceeding service expectations. Associate Dean and Professor Jane Lasseter nominated Top after seeing her interact with the students that would come up to apply for the graduate nursing program. “When we have our new applicants coming in they have to do a writing prompt,” Top explains. “And when they come in for their writing prompt we take their photo so that we can use it for the interview…So I make them take a picture up against the wall right next to Jane’s office. In her letter she talked about how I’m really nice to them because they come in and they’re really nervous for the writing prompt.” She helps to put these students at ease as they apply for their future.

Top is also consistently helpful and kind to the other faculty and staff. In fact, the people she gets to work with are her favorite part of her job. “The thing I like most about working here is the environment and the people that we work with. I feel like the staff and the faculty are a really close-knit group but they’re also really inviting.” She immediately felt included when she started working at BYU almost four years ago.

As for receiving the award, Top says, “I was super, super surprised. I didn’t even know they did those awards,” she admits with a laugh. “And they kept it a really good secret—they did it during college assembly and it was just a normal college assembly and I didn’t know it was going to happen.” It was a pleasant surprise, and the clock she received (the SAERA Award trophy) sits shining on her cabinet.

Cara Wiley

Cara Wiley

Innovation: Finding ways to improve products/services to change the way work is accomplished, 2019

Advisement Center Supervisor Cara Wiley was nominated for the SAERA Award by Associate Dean and Associate Professor Katreena Merrill in the innovation category. This was prompted by Wiley’s push for and implementation of an orientation class for first-semester nursing students.

“Before, the students had nothing,” says Wiley. When she became part of BYU nursing advisement, there was no orientation at all for nursing students. An orientation dinner was introduced, but it still was not enough. Wiley remembers, “I researched…other schools here at BYU who have limited enrollment programs, and they had orientation meetings.” It seemed to work for them, so Wiley worked to implemented it in the College of Nursing. It eventually turned into a 390R class so students could have it in their schedules.

“We’re trying to develop emotional intelligence, students’ resiliency, and [also] working on perfectionism,” Wiley explains.  “It’s literally meant to orient them, [to say], hey, this is what it’s going to be like in the nursing program.” Students are able to meet future faculty and learn about a wide variety of subjects. Wiley reports it is a work in progress. “We just keep tweaking it, trying to make it better, trying to help them come in and learn how to be resilient in the first semester so that when they hit the harder semesters, they can handle it.”

Wiley has enjoyed being a part of the orientation class. “It’s nice for me, for the advisement center, to be involved in this orientation class because the students get to know us.” It also brought about the nomination for the SAERA Award. Though she was shocked to get the award, she was also grateful. “I haven’t gotten an award like that in my 14 years of being here and it was really nice to be recognized by my boss…We’ve been doing a lot of changes, and now we’re seeing the results.”

 

Thanks, SNA For Another Great Year!

By Jessica Tanner

What do J-Dawgs, College of Nurses’ students, and a dunk-tank all have in common? All were at yesterday’s closing social for the Student Nursing Association. The society is student-run and works to coordinate events and help students become more involved in the community.

At the closing social, students were able to enjoy the crisp but sunny spring weather, eat food, chat, and dunk their favorite teacher or staff member. Assistant Teaching Professor Scott Summers was a particularly popular target as students got him back (in good humor) for a tough semester in his Pharmacology class.

SNA knows how to have fun. Izzy Algeier, SNA’s newly nominated president says that SNA strives to “provide different activities so that they can de-stress and be able to have fun, make relationships, and ultimately to become more unified as a college.”  They also know when to be professional. “Our vision is to help students…have professional opportunities while they’re in the nursing program,” says Algeier.

“It’s been awesome,” says Kami Christiansen, an SNA board member. “I got to go to the National Student Nursing Association conference. That was way fun.” At NSNA, students represented BYU and its values. “I’m grateful for it,” says Christiansen as she looks forward to future involvement.

The evening also included the announcements of the recipients of the SNA Scholarship. Congratulations to Jessica Daynes, Camille Johnson, Megan Western, Christina Hobson, and Katy Harrison. These students showed excellence in participating in several professional and service-oriented SNA events.

Thanks to all SNA members who have made these opportunities and events possible. We look forward to another year!