Category Archives: Awards

Teaching Professor Dr. Kent Blad Receives Award for Critical Care Nursing Excellence

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The college is proud to support our faculty in their accomplishments and pursuits. Photo courtesy of Blad.

By Quincey Taylor

Last week, our own faculty member teaching professor Dr. Kent Blad was recognized for his “superiority in critical care clinical practice and education.” He received the 2020 Norma J. Shoemaker Award for Critical Care Nursing Excellence and was presented with a plaque of honor by the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

This award honors Norma J. Shoemaker, RN, MN, FCCM, who was the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s first executive director. Her career spanned decades during which critical care evolved into a recognized specialty. She nurtured the organization, helping it become the professionally respected, international and multiprofessional organization it is today. This award is meant to push critical care nurses to seek excellence, never settling for less than that.

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There is no doubt that Blad is deserving of such an honor. Photo courtesy of Blad.

Dr. Blad has worked tirelessly at the BYU College of Nursing, focusing special attention for his passion for helping veterans. He is extremely worthy of such an award and has the college’s full support. As a veteran himself, Blad has a special understanding of the struggles and needs of his patients. He works to instill a love for veterans in his students and finds unique opportunities for his students to learn about them, including the annual Honor Flight.

As part of the award, a poster display featuring Dr. Blad will be hung at the 2020 Annual Congress. In addition, he received an honorarium for $1,000. Blad is grateful for the recognition and humbly accepts the award for his efforts.

BYU’s Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi: Pushing for the Platinum

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Platinum is the highest level of Phi Kappa Phi’s Circle of Excellence awards; Image provided by Phi Kappa Phi

By Lyndee Johns

Members of BYU’s Division I chapter of Phi Kappa Phi don’t just go for the gold—they push for the platinum.

Phi Kappa Phi is, as the BYU pamphlet boasts, “the nation’s oldest, largest, and most selective honor society for all academic disciplines.” Juniors in the top 7.5 percent and seniors and grad students in the top 10 percent of their classes are invited to join Phi Kappa Phi, where they are encouraged to participate in chapter activities and be on the student board.

And, as chapter president and college assistant professor Dr. Deborah Himes puts it, BYU’s chapter is “doing something right.”

The BYU chapter of Phi Kappa Phi has recently received the 2019–2020 Circle of Excellence Platinum award. This prestigious award shows that BYU has met chapter requirements, has both social and service events, and has an active student board.

And according to Himes, it is the student board that makes the chapter what it is.

“It’s a student-driven organization,” says Himes. “As the faculty members, or more the faculty/staff, we help keep things running. But we try to help them set the vision . . . We have some of the brightest students on campus, and they can make a lot happen. So we will give them opportunities to do that.”

Run by two elected vice presidents, the student board plans chapter activities. Last year, Phi Kappa Phi partnered with My Story Matters to meet refugee families living in Utah, and to record their stories. The families were later given a bound book that contained their stories, and a family picture. “It was very impactful for the kids to see them realizing that their story matters, their story is important,” says Himes.

Phi Kappa Phi’s current plans for the semester include an interdisciplinary Jeopardy event, and partnering with Dahlia’s Hope—an organization that helps victims of sex trafficking transition back into healthy living.

One of the chapter’s goals for the new year includes running a successful initiation banquet, where the Circle of Excellence award will be announced. Their other goals? “Supporting the students and their service and social activities, and, you know, trying to find ways that we can do good in the world,” says Himes.

Here’s to BYU’s Phi Kappa Phi, and may their programs stay platinum.

 

Charlie Rowberry Receives 2019 UNP Outstanding Student Award

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Charlie Rowberry (second from the left) represented BYU students and received the UNP Outstanding Student Award.

By Quincey Taylor

Graduate nursing student Charlie Rowberry recently received the 2019 Utah Nurse Practitioner Outstanding Student Award. This award, which is given to particularly dedicated students, shows that Rowberry puts her heart into her work and her compassionate service.

The nursing faculty at Brigham Young University were all impressed with Rowberry and voted to submit her name. All student nurse practitioners in Utah were considered. Rowberry was honored to be selected and hoped to represent the Utah nurse practitioner well.

Rowberry is excited to finish her final semester of didactics and begin her 265 hours of clinical rotation for her last semester before graduation. She says, “It’s been a hard journey, but I’ve loved every minute. I’m so excited to be a nurse practitioner.” In her time at BYU, she has been able to learn so much, including the Utah legislation accompanied by professor Dr. Beth Luthy (see the following article: https://byunursing.wordpress.com/2019/04/19/getting-involved-byu-graduate-students-help-to-pass-bill-at-utah-state-legislature/).

Rowberry says, “I work hard and I study hard and I love what I’m doing. I’ve had incredible help from the every member of the faculty here.” She is grateful for all the helpful advice she has received and feels that the professors truly want her to succeed, not only in nursing but in every faucet of her life.

Dr. Janelle Macintosh Receives The Alcuin Fellowship

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Receiving this award meant the world to Macintosh, and she looks forward to continuing her efforts.

By Quincey Taylor

Sometimes peoples’ efforts behind closed doors go unnoticed. Many people strive for excellence and never receive the deserved accolades. For associate professor Dr. Janelle Macintosh, however, this is not that case. Recently, Macintosh was awarded the Alcuin Fellowship for 2020- 2022 from Brigham Young University.

The Alcuin Fellowship award recognizes teacher-scholars who have gone beyond the regular limits of their disciplines and made significant contributions to the general education and honors curriculum. This perfectly describes Macintosh’s efforts over the years, and she says, “I feel so blessed by this recognition.”

As an Alcuin Fellow, Macintosh has been invited to teach an Unexpected Connections Course for the honors program. It is an exciting opportunity for a BYU College of Nursing faculty member. She has been paired with Dr. John Talbot from the English department, and together they are creating a course about literature and health, which will be taught during winter semester for three years. Macintosh says, “I know I will learn so much from Dr. Talbot and the honors students in the classes. Together we will enlarge our worldview and expand our sphere of influence.”

The College of Nursing would like to congratulate Macintosh on this amazing accomplishment. She thanks college supporters and says, “This opportunity would not be feasible without the support of the administration at the College of Nursing, the BYU Honors Program faculty and staff, and my colleague who nominated me for this fellowship. Thank you!”

 

2019 Master’s Reunion Recap

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Dean Patty Ravert and associate teaching professor Dr. Sabrina Jarvis accept their “retirement leis” during the celebration of their accomplishments. Photo courtesy of Zak Gowans.

By Quincey Taylor

 

This week was a special opportunity for alumni from the BYU nursing master’s program to unite and celebrate their alma mater. In a fun reunion which included dinner, connections, and games for the kids, nurse practitioners and nursing administrators came together to feel the spirit of the Y.

The event was marked by the celebration of the beloved professor Dr. Patricia Ravert and associate teaching professor Dr. Sabrina Jarvis, both of whom will be retiring soon. Jarvis, who is retiring in December, has made a lasting impression on the college and all who associate with it. She has been a full-time employee since 2008 and an adjunct member since 2001. Ravert, who is retiring in July, has acted as the college dean and fearless leader since 2012 and is well-respected nationally.

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Alum Brand P. Reynolds accepts the 2019 Preceptor of the Year Award for his considerable efforts as a preceptor. Photo courtesy of Zak Gowans.

Each year, an honored FNP preceptor receives an award because of their exceptional efforts in mentoring nursing students. This year’s recipient is Brand P. Reynolds (’94 BS, ’98 MS) owns his own clinic. He has been precepting graduate students for the past eight years. He is a great example of the difference a nurse practitioner in independent practice in rural Utah can make in a community.

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Graduate student Charlie Rowberry was also recognized for her accomplishments. She is a ray of sunshine! Photo courtesy of Zak Gowans.

Also honored was graduate students Charlie Rowberry, who received the Utah Nurse Practitioner Outstanding Student Award this month.

Ravert was also able to announce the sizable donation the BYU College of Nursing received from the Fritz B. Burns Foundation. This will go towards the Cheryl R. Robinson Endowed Graduate Scholarship Fund in Nursing, which will allow for increased opportunities for student tuition scholarships, student mentoring, and increased participation in additional global health sites in the future.

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Bingo was a big hit! Notice the Thanksgiving wreath being worn as a hat? Photo courtesy of Zak Gowans.

While the NPs and their spouses listened to the presentation, children were able to play Bingo, make Thanksgiving wreaths, and throw mini footballs.

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Bullseye! Photo courtesy of Zak Gowans.

Overall, this year’s reunion was a great success. We are already excited for next year’s on November 10, 2020!

Fall 2019 DAISY Award Winners Announced!

The College of Nursing at Brigham Young University continues to partner with the DAISY Foundation to recognize nursing professors and students who show extraordinary compassion. After the death of Patrick Barnes at the age of 33 from complications of an autoimmune disease, the Barnes family decided to do something positive to honor him. They established DAISY—an acronym for diseases attacking the immune system—to thank the nurses who cared for him and to recognize exceptional nurses around the world.

The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nursing Students

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Noel (middle) with Dean Ravert and her husband, Hamilton

The College of Nursing announced that it’s student award, The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nursing Students, went to Allison Bingham Noel.

Alli was nominated by her peer Keeley Austin, who writes: “Any person who meets Alli knows she is a special person. She has an infectious positive attitude and a laugh that makes everyone smile. I attended my global health clinical practicum with Alli in Fiji, and every day I became more impressed with her ability to connect with others. She became a role model for me as she found the ones who were in need and addressed those needs with her talents.

For example, we were assigned to teach a group of third-grade Fijian students about the human body. Many of our activities required the children to jump, run, and dance, and we did not account for any children who might have disabilities. When we started the lessons, I saw Alli sitting at the back of the group with a student in a wheelchair. She was attentive and helped that student participate in ways that were adjusted to meet his needs. I couldn’t believe how quickly she was able to assess the situation and find a solution. She constantly looks outward, so when she is faced with situations like this one, she adapts well. I know I can be the kind of nurse that doesn’t just go through the motions or goes according to plan. I will achieve this by following Alli’s example of compassion and seek out and address individuals’ needs.”

The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nursing Faculty

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Hunsaker (second from the left) with Dean Ravert and her family. 

The College of Nursing was also pleased to honor associate teaching professor Stacie Hunsaker with The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nursing Faculty.

Stacie received entries from several students, each one showing her level of compassion in nursing.

Hannah Hoffman writes, “I spent time with Stacie during a veteran clinical practicum. One Sunday while in Washington, D.C., an older woman fell leaving the church building and twisted her ankle. Stacie first addressed the immediate medical concern but then took time to listen to the women’s concerns, calm her fears, and ease her anxiety.”

Another nomination says, “I had only been in Stacie’s class for three weeks when I was admitted to the hospital. Stacie took time out of her extremely busy schedule to come and visit me. It meant the world to me. The care, concern, and compassion Stacie has for individuals are exemplary and beyond admirable!”

An additional student shares, “Stacie goes above and beyond to help those around her thrive. She took the time to tell me my strengths and applaud me, helping me to feel confident at a time that I was struggling to feel competent. She shared experiences from when she was a young nurse, and then laugh! The situation helped me realize that we could laugh at mistakes and the things we were stressing.”

Emily Henstrom says, “During third-semester, Stacie would set lunchtime for her clinical group, not because she had to, but because she wanted to spend those moments with us and get to know us. She has shown me so much love since I met her, and I can’t imagine my college experience without her.”

Both Hunsaker and Noel were presented with a unique sculpture as a symbol of their recognition. The small wooden token is called “A Healer’s Touch.” Each piece is hand-carved by members of the Shona Tribe in Zimbabwe.

Each semester, the College of Nursing opens nominations for additional DAISY Faculty and Nursing Student Awards. The call for submissions is your opportunity to nominate someone that reflects compassion and is an example of the Healer’s art.

 

The Valor Award: Serving Our Heroes

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Julie Minson is honored to receive this year’s Valor Award for future nurse practitioners. Photo courtesy of Minson.

By Quincey Taylor

Serving others that have given so much in honor of this country is a privilege that only select nurses get to enjoy. Some of these nurses are alumna Emily Lance Santillan (’19) and current nursing graduate student Julie Minson, both of whom received the Valor Award during their respective times in the nursing program, the first during her bachelor’s and the second during her time as a graduate student.

The Valor Award is a great opportunity for students that want to learn skills in a specialized environment. Given to students at differing times in their education, the Valor Award is modified to best help recipients at their current point of training. Undergraduate students have the opportunity to work at the George E. Wahlen Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, mimicking a paid internship, while graduate students can use the hours gained at the VA towards becoming a nurse practitioner.

Surrounded by experienced nurses and guided by their preceptors, Santillan and Minson readily cared for a population that is in need of their love and attention.

Emily’s Experience

The Nursing VA Learning Opportunity Residency (VALOR) Program is for outstanding students who have completed their junior year of an accredited baccalaureate nursing program and may be interested in a nursing career in the Department of Veterans Affairs. Under the guidance of a VA registered nurse preceptor, VALOR students have opportunities for clinical practice and competencies in a nursing specialty area. The student will also complete an independent, problem-focused, clinical project.

Santillan was so grateful for the experience she had at the VA. She says, “It was a huge growing and learning experience. My confidence as a nurse just skyrocketed. From the beginning to the end, I feel like I was ready to graduate and be a nurse, like the next day if I could.”

She felt that this chance to learn was different than other opportunities that she’d had. She continues, “Sometimes during clinical, it gets you close, but not quite to that point where you are on your own. At VA, I felt like I could do most things independently for the whole day. I could do charting, meds, interventions, everything. That was invaluable for me to have that confidence.”

Santillan was inspired to apply for the Valor Award after doing clinical at the VA with assistant professor Dr. Julie Valentine during her third semester. She loved the experience and decided to apply that next summer. The application process for her was almost like any other job interview, and she was thrilled when she was selected.

That summer, she worked almost full time in order to achieve 400 working hours by the start of fall semester. If she wanted to return to work there now after graduation, it would be a relatively simple process.

Santillan is grateful for her time at BYU and says, “It stretched me a lot and challenged me a lot, but was very rewarding. I feel like if you’re comfortable, you’re not growing. You’ve got to get out of your comfort zone and grow… I know I’m a completely different person. I know I’ve improved so much since when I started at BYU.”

Since completion of her Bachelor’s degree, Santillan has had a baby, and hopes to return to nursing in the fall.

Julie’s Experience

The VA funded learning opportunity for nurse practitioner student clinical training is reserved for graduate DNP and MSN students interested in a nursing career in the Department of Veterans Affairs. Their working hours gained at the VA can go towards their clinical hours to become a nurse practitioner.

“This award actually came as a great surprise to me,” she remarks. She had been thinking about where she wanted to work when she was done with school, and the VA came to mind. She applied to their internship program, where she will be doing her capstone. She was thrilled when she was selected to participate.

She says, “I had been talking to associate professor Dr. Beth Luthy about how excited I was about applying and how I was looking forward to how rigorous the training is, and the growth I will have there.  They see lots of complex patients with complex problems and I know that I will learn so much.”

Unbeknownst to Minson, Luthy nominated her for the Valor Award and she was chosen! She says, “I was humbled and also very grateful to receive this award. I have always loved the elderly.  I started out as a CNA in high school and worked at rest homes and doing home health care with the geriatric population to get through my undergraduate. I also love the grandmas of my ward and love sitting with them.  I’ve always loved their deep well of knowledge and life experiences; they have a deep reservoir of love for their fellowmen because of what life has taught them. Taking care of an aging body with such a deep and wonderful heart can be a challenge, and it’s one I’m looking forward to.”

Coming back to school at 40 years old with three children was not easy for Minson, but she has enjoyed every minute. She says, “I’ve been blown away by how much each professor is individually interested in me and my learning.  This is a topnotch program and if you’re thinking about becoming a nurse practitioner then BYU is the best choice!”

She wants to give a special thanks to Luthy and associate teaching professor Dr. Blaine Winters for their confidence in her and nominating her.