Author Archives: College of Nursing Media Team

Nursing Staff and Administration Receive SAERA Awards

Photo courtesy of BYU Human Resources

By Jessica Tanner

Three of our incredible staff and administration have recently been recipients of the Staff and Administrative Employee Recognition (SAERA) Award: Kathy Whitenight, Cherie Top, and Cara Wiley. These amazing women have displayed levels of continual learning, innovation, and care that have improved the College of Nursing and BYU. The University-sponsored SAERA Award recognizes those who have shown competency, respect for sacred resources, integrity, teamwork, exceeding customer expectation, respect for all individuals, innovation and accountability. These women have definitely achieved that.

Kathy Whitenight

Kathy Whitenight

Competency: Striving for excellence and sharpening skills on a continuous basis, 2018.

“As an assistant dean, Kathy Whitenight is essential to the workings of the college of Nursing,” writes Dean Patricia Ravert, who nominated her for the award in 2018. On receiving the award Whitenight reports, “I know when other people are getting the awards but I had no idea I was submitted. So it was a big surprise and really an honor to get it.”

There were several reasons why Dean Ravert nominated Whitenight in the competency category. Whitenight has kept up with legal matters, managed updates in physical facilities, and overseen human resources.  Another major department she oversees is Risk Management, where she helps students get the care they need in case of incident or injury. In this duty, Whitenight demonstrates personal care to each student. “They have my cellphone; they can call me 24/7,” she explains. “I’ve only gotten one call in the last year at 3:00 a.m. but I want them to that. I’d rather have them do that than not get the care they need and the financial coverage.” Whitenight keeps up on policies and procedures to help students avoid potential problems.

On Whitenight’s wall hangs James C. Christensen’s painting The Widow’s Might. “I have this picture on the wall,” she explains, “because…most of the things [we do] are done through tithing dollars. And that’s the widow’s mite.” Working with finances, Whitenight handles sacred resources with great care and respect.

Whitenight has to learn continually to keep up with technology and policies. “Each day something new could come in that I’ve never experienced before. And that’s what makes it exciting.”

Cherie Top

Cherie Top:

Exceeding Service Expectations: Serving the needs of others beyond what is expected, 2018

Cherie Top, the Graduate Program and Research Secretary, was awarded for exceeding service expectations. Associate Dean and Professor Jane Lasseter nominated Top after seeing her interact with the students that would come up to apply for the graduate nursing program. “When we have our new applicants coming in they have to do a writing prompt,” Top explains. “And when they come in for their writing prompt we take their photo so that we can use it for the interview…So I make them take a picture up against the wall right next to Jane’s office. In her letter she talked about how I’m really nice to them because they come in and they’re really nervous for the writing prompt.” She helps to put these students at ease as they apply for their future.

Top is also consistently helpful and kind to the other faculty and staff. In fact, the people she gets to work with are her favorite part of her job. “The thing I like most about working here is the environment and the people that we work with. I feel like the staff and the faculty are a really close-knit group but they’re also really inviting.” She immediately felt included when she started working at BYU almost four years ago.

As for receiving the award, Top says, “I was super, super surprised. I didn’t even know they did those awards,” she admits with a laugh. “And they kept it a really good secret—they did it during college assembly and it was just a normal college assembly and I didn’t know it was going to happen.” It was a pleasant surprise, and the clock she received (the SAERA Award trophy) sits shining on her cabinet.

Cara Wiley

Cara Wiley

Innovation: Finding ways to improve products/services to change the way work is accomplished, 2019

Advisement Center Supervisor Cara Wiley was nominated for the SAERA Award by Associate Dean and Associate Professor Katreena Merrill in the innovation category. This was prompted by Wiley’s push for and implementation of an orientation class for first-semester nursing students.

“Before, the students had nothing,” says Wiley. When she became part of BYU nursing advisement, there was no orientation at all for nursing students. An orientation dinner was introduced, but it still was not enough. Wiley remembers, “I researched…other schools here at BYU who have limited enrollment programs, and they had orientation meetings.” It seemed to work for them, so Wiley worked to implemented it in the College of Nursing. It eventually turned into a 390R class so students could have it in their schedules.

“We’re trying to develop emotional intelligence, students’ resiliency, and [also] working on perfectionism,” Wiley explains.  “It’s literally meant to orient them, [to say], hey, this is what it’s going to be like in the nursing program.” Students are able to meet future faculty and learn about a wide variety of subjects. Wiley reports it is a work in progress. “We just keep tweaking it, trying to make it better, trying to help them come in and learn how to be resilient in the first semester so that when they hit the harder semesters, they can handle it.”

Wiley has enjoyed being a part of the orientation class. “It’s nice for me, for the advisement center, to be involved in this orientation class because the students get to know us.” It also brought about the nomination for the SAERA Award. Though she was shocked to get the award, she was also grateful. “I haven’t gotten an award like that in my 14 years of being here and it was really nice to be recognized by my boss…We’ve been doing a lot of changes, and now we’re seeing the results.”

 

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Getting Involved: BYU Graduate Students Help to Pass Bill at Utah State Legislature

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Students Libby Willmore (left), Charlie Rowberry (center), and Julie Palmer (right) lobbying at the state capitol.

By Quincey Taylor

When you think of a House of Representatives or a state legislature, what kind of people do you imagine there? Perhaps middle-aged men in tailored suits? Well, first year BYU graduate nursing students Libby Willmore, Charlie Rowberry, and Julie Palmer are breaking that stereotype. These students were not afraid to stand up and work towards making changes that will directly affect them after graduation.

These motivated students had the chance to assist associate professor Dr. Beth Luthy – who is also the Legislative Chair for the Utah Association of Nurse Practitioners – in lobbying House Bill 336 in the Utah State Legislature. Getting a bill passed is a long and difficult process, but these students were up to the challenge as they were led by their stalwart professor.

 

Why was House Bill 336 created?

A nurse practitioner’s scope of practice, or what they’re allowed to do, is dictated by every individual state. There are no national guidelines or regulations. As a result, some states choose to allow NPs to practice full authority within the NP scope of practice, while other states extremely limit what NPs can do. Many times these restrictive states require by law for NPs to be under the direction of a physician at all times.

Utah’s laws fall somewhere in the middle of these two extremes. For example, when NPs in Utah graduate, they are subject to the Consultation and Referral Plan (CRP) which requires them to be under the direction of a physician for the first two years or 2,000 hours of practice when prescribing controlled substances.

When a physician opts to be responsible for an NP, he signs a mandated document that many physicians charge NPs thousands of dollars to receive.

While originally written to more closely regulate the prescriptions of opiates and other dangerous substances, these laws have evolved to a rule that ties the hands of newly graduated nurse practitioners and requires them to pay thousands of dollars for a piece of paper that likely will sit in a filing cabinet until they reach two years of practice or 2,000 clinical hours, whichever comes first.

This was also a problem because nurses could easily avoid these charges if they simply chose to move to a state that doesn’t require them, thus driving nurses away from Utah practices.

 

What happened when House Bill 336 was implemented?

After working with legislators and coming to a common agreement, HB 336 was passed. The law was changed to require newly graduated NPs to have a CRP only for the first year or 2,000 hours of practice if opening their own clinic. They also changed who could give out a CRP mandated document, now allowing other senior NPs in the field to act as their referral.

This will now be friendlier to small practices opened up by nurse practitioners, allowing them to hire employees without the need for physician supervision. They can practice more easily in rural areas where there might not be a surplus of physicians.

Changing the law will also save new NPs thousands of dollars they might have paid to physicians in past years.

 

Why were these students interested in participating?

These laws would have affected any nursing student that decided to stay in Utah after graduation. This was something that personally motivated Willmore to get involved. She said she became interested in helping when “Professor Luthy was talking about her work at the capitol building during class and mentioned that she could use some help. I figured that working with law makers to change practice regulations for nurse practitioners will directly affect me when I graduate so I better get in there and help out.”

These students were active participants in Luthy’s legislative committee and personally lobbied to gain support to pass the bill. They dutifully participated, coming up to the capitol multiple times a week during the campaign.

Luthy is so proud of the efforts of these students and says, “All three of those students were fully engaged. Every day they were up at the capitol. They were lobbying. They were attending committee meetings. They testified in committee hearings. I mean, it was completely amazing.” She is looking forward to future developments to progress the cause of nurse practitioners.

Thanks, SNA For Another Great Year!

By Jessica Tanner

What do J-Dawgs, College of Nurses’ students, and a dunk-tank all have in common? All were at yesterday’s closing social for the Student Nursing Association. The society is student-run and works to coordinate events and help students become more involved in the community.

At the closing social, students were able to enjoy the crisp but sunny spring weather, eat food, chat, and dunk their favorite teacher or staff member. Assistant Teaching Professor Scott Summers was a particularly popular target as students got him back (in good humor) for a tough semester in his Pharmacology class.

SNA knows how to have fun. Izzy Algeier, SNA’s newly nominated president says that SNA strives to “provide different activities so that they can de-stress and be able to have fun, make relationships, and ultimately to become more unified as a college.”  They also know when to be professional. “Our vision is to help students…have professional opportunities while they’re in the nursing program,” says Algeier.

“It’s been awesome,” says Kami Christiansen, an SNA board member. “I got to go to the National Student Nursing Association conference. That was way fun.” At NSNA, students represented BYU and its values. “I’m grateful for it,” says Christiansen as she looks forward to future involvement.

The evening also included the announcements of the recipients of the SNA Scholarship. Congratulations to Jessica Daynes, Camille Johnson, Megan Western, Christina Hobson, and Katy Harrison. These students showed excellence in participating in several professional and service-oriented SNA events.

Thanks to all SNA members who have made these opportunities and events possible. We look forward to another year!

 

Earthquake at the MTC: Nursing Students Participate in Mock Mass Casualty Incident

By Jessica Tanner

Watch the video of the mock Mass Casualty Incident here!

In the cool, dark tunnels beneath the Provo Missionary Training Center, 100 victims cried out for help. At 4:00 pm on March 30, 2019, an emergency call was answered by BYU Emergency Medical Services and College of Nursing students, who quickly came to the rescue. They handled the situation with level heads and caring hands, treating scrapes and bruises, broken bones and shock. Within a few hours, victims had been treated and cared for.

Similar emergency simulations takes place each semester for fifth-semester nursing students, organized by BYU EMS. Each time is a different situation and location. The most recent disaster was an earthquake. BYU theatre students volunteered to be earthquake victims, with fake wounds and ripped clothes to set the scene. Some had scratches and bruises, others missing eyes or fingers, some had broken bones, and others had glass embedded in their wounds. Once in the tunnel, these students did not hold back in acting the part of a victim—wounded and afraid, calling out for help and for loved ones.

Mockdisaster3

BYU EMS carry an earthquake victim

Nursing students and EMS rushed in from various locations, including BYU campus and near-by homes. They searched along the tunnel for those in critical condition. Amidst a cacophony of moans and screams, they were able to identify which victims were in the most need by a wristband that identified their vitals and condition. They tied red tags on victims in critical condition, yellow tags for less serious injuries, and green who were not in need of urgent treatment. Most victims, however, fell into the first two categories.

Students set up a treatment center with incredible speed—a large tarp near the tunnel entrance with medical supplies at the ready. EMS carried red-tagged victims to the treatment area. Here, nursing students and EMS were direct and compassionate as they asked questions, such as “What is your name?”, “Can you hear me?” or “Where does it hurt?” They reassured the victims, saying, “We’re going to take care of you, all right?” as they called out for oxygen and gauze. Working together, nursing students and EMS were able to treat those in need.

Mockdisaster7

A nursing student treats and calms an earthquake victim

“I hope that they’ll see another side of healthcare,” says associate teaching professor Dr. Blaine Winters on what he hopes the nursing students have learned from the simulation. “They’re usually in a very controlled environment in the hospital and when things happen outside of a hospital it’s not controlled, it’s chaos. So I wanted them to get an understanding of what goes on before the patient gets to the hospital. And then also to be able to function if they were to be put in that type of situation; to at least have a little experience of what they could do as a nurse in the field if they had to.”

Mockdisaster2

Nursing students and BYU EMS work together to treat patients

One important skill students learned, besides basic treatments, is communication. Fifth-semester nursing student Jaylee Bastian says, “We were working with other EMS as well as the patients, so it was good to know how to communicate and be open and friendly especially with the patients because they were in such dire circumstances.” Even though those “dire circumstance” were simulated, participants like Bastian were fully engaged in the process.

Emergencies happen. But being prepared for these situations, not only through study but through practice, can calm chaos and save lives.

 

Planting a Seed: Sharing the Gospel at NSNA Convention

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By Quincey Taylor

Opportunities to share the gospel sometimes come when you least expect them. Such was the case with third semester students Lela Hill and Izzy Bernal who were attending the National Student Nurses’ Association Annual Convention on April 3-6, 2019.

 

Praying for an Opportunity

It all started when Hill was impressed during church to pray for more missionary opportunities. She felt an earnest desire to share her testimony of the Book of Mormon, which is sometimes a difficult experience to find in a place like Provo, Utah.

Hill was planning on going to the nursing conference in Salt Lake City and knew she would be mingling with people from all over the country, many of which would not be members of Christ’s church. She prayed for the opportunity to show Temple Square to other nursing students she might meet. Full of hope, she packed her mini travel-sized Book of Mormon in her bag and left for the conference.

presenting

Assistant professor Dr. Deborah Himes presenting at the conference.

 

Recognizing Impressions

At the conference, various schools and organizations set up booths to raise awareness and find applicants for their programs. BYU set up a booth with a fun “Spin to Win” wheel that provided conference participants with the chance to win nursing stickers and BYU truffles. Hill remembers being at the booth when two Pennsylvania students approached. They were excited to see that the BYU students were from Utah and asked what they could do here in their free time.

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BYU’s booth captured audience excitement with a prize wheel!

When talking about the people of Utah, the church naturally came up in the conversation. One of the girls was very interested and asked, “So Mormonism is a branch of Christianity?” Bernal and Hill nodded yes, to which she continued, “I’m Catholic, what’s the difference?” Hill remarks, “Smiles spread over our faces as we glanced at each other eager for the opportunity to teach more.”

 

Faith to Act

Bernal and Hill began to teach the individuals about the restoration of the church. They had never heard of Joseph Smith and wanted to know the meaning of the word “Mormon.” That was when Hill remembered she had packed a copy of the Book of Mormon in her bag.

Hill says, “The girls were super interested and asked amazing questions about the Book of Mormon. It was neat, because having been a missionary before, I could tell these girls were prepared to hear the word of God. I noticed that the one girl understood her own religion very well, therefore allowing her to note the key differences of our religions.”

Hill and Bernal marked 3 Nephi 11 and invited the two students to read with open hearts and minds. Their new friends seemed enthralled to hear that Christ had not only visited the Americas in ancient times, but had also performed many miracles. They gave them the Book of Mormon, swapped phone numbers, and parted ways with plans to meet up later and tour the temple grounds.

 

Watching General Conference

Unfortunately, plans fell through and the four students didn’t have the time to see Temple Square together. The girls were so interested, however, that they went on a tour  with the sister missionaries on their own time. They loved the experience and wanted to know more.

Bernal texted a link to LDS.org to one of them and invited her to watch general conference. She ended up watching the sessions and even asked “How often do new prophets arise and how do you know they are prophets?”

All have become Facebook friends and plan on staying in touch in the future, perhaps even meeting with the missionaries this summer to hear the lessons.

 

Being Willing to Bear Testimony

Opportunities to share the gospel come when you least expect them. Hill says, “I knew that there was no coincidence that God put them in our path and inspired me to pack the Book of Mormon and keep it in my bag for easy access. I have so much hope that this girl will return to Pennsylvania and continue to learn about the church. I know that we were able to be instruments in the Lord’s hands and strengthen our own testimonies by planting a few seeds in someone else’s heart.”

The Anatomy and Chemistry Survival Guide

By Jessica Tanner

Finals are almost here. Fortunately, so is Emerie McQuiston, a second-semester student working as a first-year student mentor. While she focuses on mentoring pre-nursing students, especially as they balance Chemistry 285 and Human Anatomy homework, the strategies she gives are universal. So, whether you need some study tips for finals or are looking to do the prerequisites in the coming semesters, this study guide can help you not only survive but thrive in your classes. It may even help you form lasting friendships.

McQuiston had a lot of insight, but she knew that her methods wouldn’t work for everyone. She reached out to friends and classmates to come up with a study guide for her students. “It [is] beneficial to have people that are similar to them but also a ton of different opinions because everyone learns a little bit differently.” Here is what McQuiston and her peers recommend:

Anatomy and Chemistry Survival Guide

I asked some of my classmates what they thought helped them most in Human Anatomy and Chem 285. These classes can be tough, and I thought that it would be beneficial for some to have multiple opinions on how to succeed. I hope you can find something on this list that helps you. You are going to do great this semester!

Chemistry:

  • (Savage) After class each day, go through your notes and do as much as you can on the problem set. Doing it as you go helps so it’s not as much work at the end, and also gives you the opportunity to ask for help if you need it.
  • Block out at least one TA reviews in your schedule. Treat it like another class and try not to miss.
  • Form a study group and try to meet at least once a week.
  • For study groups, try to find a regular time during the week to hold your meetings. Setting a regular time allows you to be more prepared to contribute and/or come up with questions beforehand.
  • Find study groups that you can also be friends with. That way, studying is fun while being productive, rather than just stress.
  • There is a walk-in tutorial lab in W151 BNSN. They are open most of the day and there are always TAs to help with homework or studying. Some suggested just doing homework in the lab so you can ask questions as they come up.
  • Reach out to your TAs! They are very well qualified to help you. They can bridge the gap between your professor and you.
  • Notice how the material is applying in your life. The more you think about it, the more it will stick.

Anatomy:

  • Teach everyone you can about what you learn: your roommates, your mom, everyone! Repetition is key.
  • Regularly schedule time in the lab. Block out your schedule at some point each week.
  • Find good study groups as soon as possible.
  • Repeat from above but…Find study groups that you can also be friends with. That way, studying is fun while being productive, rather than just stress.
  • Focus your study on the learning objectives for lecture.
  • For the terms, breaking them down and understand all parts makes them easier to remember.
  • Look up pictures online of different body parts you are studying so you can get used to seeing a variety of bodies.
  • Go to open lab and study with different students. Finding out how other people study and remember things can be very beneficial.
  • When it comes to the final, go through the body head to toe, making sure you know everything.
  • Go to at least one weekly review each week.

Of course, don’t feel like you have to do all of things to do well in these classes! Find something that works well for you and stick with it.

…..

McQuiston enjoys being a student mentor. “I love it! I love helping pre-nursing students especially…I feel like it really does make a difference for them,” she says. “I wish that I had someone close to me that I could ask questions [to] about the program before I got in.” She has decided to pay it forward and help others.

One of the best rewards has been the friendships she has made both from student mentoring and her study groups. “I have even connected some of my students together because they are all pre-nursing,” she explains. “And I have students that have formed friendships through that.” Yes, studying hard is important, but why not make friends at the same time? By following McQuiston’s survival guide, you won’t just pass your classes, you will look back on rewarding experiences and life-long friendships.

Good luck with finals everyone!

 

 

Mentoring the Next Generation: Dr. Linda Mabey

Linda Mabey

After a 30-year career teaching psychiatric nursing and mentoring students, Dr. Linda Mabey is retiring to expand her clinical practice, where she specializes in trauma treatment, as well as to pursue other interests. Mabey graduated from Idaho State University in 1978 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing. She began her career in labor and delivery but soon found her interest in psychiatric mental health nursing. In 1984, she began a master’s degree in psychiatric nursing. She remembers this time of her life fondly and says, “I loved my experience as a master’s student. The opportunity to work one-on-one with patients to improve their functioning was so meaningful— especially as I grew to understand how critical mental health is to overall health.”

After graduation, Mabey taught at Westminster College and later at the University of Utah, where she instructed both undergraduate and graduate nursing students in the art and science of psychiatric nursing. She completed her doctorate of nursing practice from the University of Utah in 2009 and joined the faculty at the BYU College of Nursing in 2011.

In her position at the college, Mabey taught courses on both psychiatric mental health nursing and public and global health nursing. She says, “It was an amazing opportunity to work with students on the Navajo Indian Reservation in Chinle, Arizona, as well as supervise students in the care of refugees and other at-risk populations.”

While at the university, Mabey also joined with Dr. Julie Valentine and Dr. Leslie Miles in researching the prevalence and characteristics of sexual assault. With students that she mentored in the research process, she presented regionally, nationally, and internationally on their findings. She also assisted in training law enforcement officials on conducting trauma-informed interviewing of sexual assault victims.

After retirement, Mabey looks forward to continuing to work at her private practice, as well as spending more time with her grandchildren. When asked what nursing has meant to her, Mabey replied, “Nursing was a wonderful career choice. It is eminently rewarding to teach bright students, work with incredible faculty and staff, and continue my growth as a psychiatric clinical nurse specialist. I will be forever grateful to those who mentored me in both nursing and teaching.”