Author Archives: College of Nursing Media Team

Graduate Student Creates Coolsculpting Guide for Nurse Practitioners

millie without zit

Photo of Harper. Photo by college employee Andrew Holman.

By Quincey Taylor

Body image is a hot topic in today’s society. From weight loss pills to diet regimens, it’s important for individuals to take the safe option for their own body type. Coolsculpting, also known as cryolipolysis, is one of the newest options on the market for individuals to change their body shape. Millie Harper, second year graduate student in the BYU College of Nursing, is creating a guide with the help of associate dean and professor Dr. Jane Lassetter for nurse practitioners to become more informed about this procedure in order to give the best care and advice to their patients.

It all started when Lassetter was at a beauty salon and noticed the coolsculpting procedure being done. “That didn’t really sit well with her,” explains Harper, “She thought that that should be something that should be overseen by health providers. She wanted to investigate further about the requirements and the risks and see if that was something that should be done in a beauty salon.”

Since then, Lassetter has done extensive research and has enlisted the help of Harper, acting as the chair of Harper’s writing project. This scholarly paper, which takes the place of Harper’s thesis, will act as a guide for nurse practitioners who may have patients who are interested in coolsculpting. Harper expounds that this will allow nurses to answer patients’ questions like, “Am I candidate? Would this be a good option for me? Is this something I should investigate further?” This guide will allow practitioners to be able to direct them to the best option.

In many cases, coolsculpting has provided lasting results for localized fat reduction. The procedure essentially freezes – and kills – fat cells in the body with a gel vacuum which are then reabsorbed into the system. Many times the process is focused on a certain area of the body, like the abdomen or upper arms. This isn’t necessarily a weight loss procedure, however, it focuses more on the sculpting of the body into a desirable shape.

Harper tells of the risks that are involved with the procedure, especially if the facility is questionable. She says, “Putting a cold device on your skin for 30 minutes isn’t always a good idea.” The biggest risk is frostbite, but other risks include increasing lipid levels and changing the chemical nature inside your body. Many times the individuals operating the machines have attended only a three-day course, and are only overseen from a distance by medical spa professionals.

It is important for nurses to be informed about this procedure because of its growing popularity. Body image is a big issue for a lot of people,” Harper says, “It’s important to be educated about it.”

 

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From Victim of Car Theft to Victor of Life

By Jessica Tanner

Finals week as a nursing student is already tough, but for Keeley Austin – a fifth-semester student in the nursing program – coming home to find her Subaru Outback missing was a new level of stress.  Austin not only had final exams, but also worked doing hospice visits that required her to drive to her patients. She and her husband searched other possible parking spots for the car, hoping they had just parked it somewhere else. But Austin felt sure of where she had last parked it, always being careful when it comes to the car. “I check for my car to make sure it’s there every day,” she explains.

After having no luck with the search, they contacted the local police who registered the missing car. Meanwhile, Austin and her husband kept up the search. They even spotted a similar car being sold on KSL. Austin was eager to check it out. However, that vehicle turned out not to be theirs.

Though Austin posted about the event to warn others in the Provo area, the outreach that she received from friends and peers was reassuring. “Everyone was super supportive,” she says. “Everyone reached out, saying if you need rides we’re here for you, which was awesome.” Thanks to the help, they were able to get through the next few car-less days.

It was actually on a grocery run with a friend giving her a ride that Austin spotted her car at last. “My heart was just so happy and scared,” she remembers. From the clicking noises and heat emitting from the car, she could tell the driver had just left it. That made Austin feel violated. Peeking inside, she could see their things were missing. But any loss was overcome by the relief that they had finally found it. They contacted the police and watched the car until the police arrived.

“It’s a bummer that it happened to me, but it worked out in the end,” Austin reflects, relating how she grew from the experience. She learned that car-theft in the area is frequent because most college cars are older and easier to break into. She also learned how to prevent future theft, such as with the steering wheel lock they now own. Most are not aware of these useful gadgets. When Austin bought one, the employee at AutoZone said it was the first he had sold. “It’s a good reassurance,” says Austin. “Maybe someone can break into my car and steal my stuff, but they can’t take my car!”

The experience gave Austin a fresh perspective, moving forward with a confidence in her ability to get through challenges. Not only did they have their car stolen, but their house also flooded soon after. As she faces another stressful semester, and an upcoming study abroad to Fiji, she says, “Now I feel like nothing can affect me. What are material possessions anyway? God gives it to us; it was His in the first place, He can have it back.”

Above all, the outreach they received was priceless. “I just felt love,” Austin remembers. “It made it easier to cope.” When stressed about an appointment with a patient or getting groceries, she could remember, “I don’t have a car, but I have all these friends that are willing to help out. We can get through this situation just fine.”

New Staff Members: Robert Dickerson and Jon Hardy

robPhoto of Dickerson. Photo courtesy of Leo Liang.

By Quincey Taylor

With the start of the new semester, the College of Nursing welcomes two new staff members to the family. Robert Dickerson will be joining the IT department in administration, and Jon Hardy is taking over as the new Nursing Learning Center Facilities Supervisor. We look forward to getting to know these men a little better and hope their transition is smooth.

Dickerson completed his undergraduate at BYU Idaho studying software engineering. When asked about how he found out about this open position, he laughs, “That’s a funny story.” In Santa Clarita, California, he was part of the singles ward council. The ward council was looking for ways to get members more active in the local self-reliance classes put on by the stake. As part of this motivation, they decided to attend the classes and be an example.

Dickerson attended the classes for twelve weeks without much expectation. He was looking for a job at the time, but did not expect the class to result in his next career path. That’s where he was wrong. The facilitator of the class told him about the opening posted on LinkedIn for a senior software engineer at the College of Nursing, and he applied. He says, “This ended up being one of the best jobs I can find right now in my career. I’m really happy and grateful for this job.”

Outside of work, Dickerson enjoys playing volleyball and being a great uncle to his four nieces and nephews. He taught improv comedy for a year and performed it for three. He loves his family and always looks forward to a trip to the temple.

In the future, Dickerson plans to get a master’s degree in computer science at BYU while continuing working. He says about his new life here in Provo, “I know this is where I need to be.”

jonHardy and his wife and kids. Photo courtesy of Hardy.

As the new NLC Facilities Supervisor, Hardy will act as the ‘man behind the curtain,’ ensuring everything in the Mary Jane Rawlinson Geertsen Nursing Learning Center is running smoothly.

BYU has been a part of Hardy’s life for as long as he can remember. He is originally from Spanish Fork, so he always lived close. His father has been working at BYU for thirty years, currently in the Treasury Services. Hardy had been looking for an opportunity at BYU for a while now, and was overjoyed at this new opportunity to follow in his father’s footsteps.

Before the College of Nursing, Hardy studied at UVU. He also worked as their head custodian over the Student Life and Wellness Center. He graduated from UVU with a degree in technology management.

Hardy is married with two kids, ages four and six. His wife, Olivia, is from Wyoming. The two met here at BYU as students and coworkers.

Outside of work, Hardy enjoys playing board games and spending time with his family. He also loves hiking and the outdoors in general.

Hardy looks forward to helping streamline as much as possible in the simulation lab, making it easier for all participants. “I’m excited,” Hardy exclaims, “to be working with all of the great nursing students and faculty here.”

 

Serving Beyond the Y

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Merrill (left) and Moore (right). Photo courtesy of Moore.

By Quincey Taylor

Cookies and milk, movies and popcorn, picnics and watermelon. Some things just go together. The same goes for Heather Merrill and Atalie Moore, BYU nursing alumni and best friends. These two have big plans and big hearts. In March, they will be volunteering in Greece to help with the treatment of a growing refugee population. They will volunteer for DocMobile, a company who gives care to those in need from the back of a van.

Moore and Merrill both graduated from the BYU nursing program in December of 2017. They have enjoyed gaining experience in the medical field since graduation. However, they wanted to find a way to do more. While in school, they had gone on a study abroad to Ecuador and had a chance to serve people there. Both fell in love with the chance to assist international populations in a sustainable way.

The desire to serve refugees in particular was inspired by Merrill’s interest in the Syrian refugee crisis. This war is different than any other we have seen in history, Merrill states, because “they are specifically targeting civilian areas in Syria, like hospitals and schools.” The devastation of the Syrian population has been widespread and drawn out, driving them to neighboring countries for survival

The war in the Middle East has been a seemingly never-ending struggle. Merrill worries that these news stories have become commonplace to Americans. She says, “Every day in Syria people are still getting bombed and it’s created a huge crisis.” Merrill and Moore have a goal of raising awareness to this issue as well as motivating other volunteers to find ways to serve.

They realize that it’s not feasible for everyone who wants to help to go abroad, but luckily there are many opportunities for people to volunteer locally. Merrill says, “Usually the best impact you can make is close by. I love going abroad and helping people but I also hesitate because you have to be aware of the impact you’re going to make.” Moore adds, “In the end, not everyone can go on trips like we’re going on. That’s okay. You don’t have to.”

To find a way to start, they recommend using resources like the Just Serve app, which includes different opportunities to help refugees in areas as close as Salt Lake City.

Moore had their plan confirmed in her mind after an experience while working at the Utah Valley Hospital. A patient of hers was a refugee from the Congo, and they were communicating by typing into an iPad and translating. She says about the experience, “I got talking to her at the beginning of the day, and I asked her about her family and how long have she had been here. She just said, ‘Well, my sister and I were able to escape but the rest of my family was killed.’ I can’t even imagine. That’s her reality. We have no concept of that. We have no idea. That’s just her life. She just has to keep moving forward and find a way to continue on and I think that moment just solidified my desire to help with the refugee crisis. We need to be doing something. There’s such a need.”

Merrill feels that, as a healthcare professional, “You need to be aware of not only the refugee crisis but all of the different crises or hard situations for people around the world. You need to stay aware of current events so that you can raise awareness and help.”

College Employee at Donald C. Sloan Speech Showcase

Quincey Taylor at Competition

Quincey Taylor speaking at the Donald C. Sloan Speech competition. Photo courtesy of Taylor.

By Mindy Longhurst

It has been said that some people fear public speaking even more than they fear death. Quincey Taylor, BYU College of Nursing’s Public Relations Assistant, took a speaking class this past Fall semester to overcome her fear of public speaking and to grow her skill base as a public relations major. In this class, she learned good speaking practices, how to be in front of an audience and how to make speeches more captivating.

When a student takes the Student Development 150 Public Speaking course, they are automatically signed up to be entered into the Donald C. Sloan Speech Showcase competition. At the end of the semester, nine finalists from all of the public speaking courses are chosen to speak at the Donald C. Sloan Speech Showcase.

Taylor knew what she wanted to speak about for her persuasive speech for the competition. She decided to speak about something she is passionate about- financial education. About financial education Taylor says. “So many students go to college and graduate without knowing about finances and in particular, the stock market. This is something that I believe in and is something that I think will help my audience which is other students.”

Taylor was chosen as a finalist out of over 200 students to present her five-minute speech at the Donald C. Sloan Speech Showcase. Taylor was at first nervous to give her speech in front of so many people. But, because of her passion for her topic, she was able to stand with confidence and give her speech presentation perfectly.

Taylor wants people to learn about finances when they are young. Everyone can use tools like the stock market. When you start using the stock market when you are young and keep it long term, it will grow. Part of learning about the stock market is becoming educated in the stock market. Start small, even just reading one article or listening to a financial speech will help people to understand finances better.

Taylor believes that everyone should practice public speaking. She says, “I think it is a great skill for anyone. Public speaking can be applied in many different situations. Throughout your life, you are going to be asked to speak maybe at a funeral, or a wedding, or in church, or if you are a nurse you might need to speak at a conference or to your staff. Having those skills is really valuable.”

Taylor wants to thank Kevin Jones, her donor for the scholarship she received from the Donald C. Sloan Speech Showcase competition.

Thank You, College of Nursing!

By Mindy Longhurst

Mindy Longhurst has worked as a Public Relations Assistant in the BYU College of Nursing since May 2018. She just completed her bachelor’s degree in Communications with an emphasis in Public Relations and a minor in Family Studies.

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An image of Mindy Longhurst. Image courtesy of Andrew Holman.

I am alive today because nurses helped to save my life. My twin sister and I were born prematurely at 24 weeks. We both weighed a little over a pound and the doctors did not have good prognoses for our chances of living. We were born at a university medical center and were each assigned a nurse to watch us daily. Throughout the five months that we were in the NICU, our parents would visit us daily and the doctors and nurses became like family. They watched us struggle and eventually triumph, being able to leave the hospital without any major medical complications.

A love for nurses was instilled in me when I was very young. Growing up, my mom would always speak fondly of the nurses who helped us. My mom calls our nurses from the NICU every year on our birthday. She calls them to give them an update on our lives and to thank them for the countless hours that they spent taking care of us.

Since I have a love and appreciation for nurses, the opportunity to be an intern for the College of Nursing was a dream come true! I was thrilled to start to promote the great work that nurses do. I expected that the students, faculty and staff for the College of Nursing were going to be brilliant. I knew that they would have good hearts to want to help others. But, what I did not expect was the welcoming and joyous nature that everyone has in the College of Nursing. The students, faculty and staff are all wonderful people who made me feel a part of everything from the time that I was hired. This has meant so much to me!

I have loved getting to know the faculty and staff members better. It has been amazing to learn about their interests, hobbies and the research that they have conducted with students. I think it is amazing that undergraduate and graduate students are able to have the experiences of working with faculty to make a difference in healthcare.

Getting to know the nursing students has been fun! I love the opportunity to be able to meet new people and have met some of the nicest students on campus in the College of Nursing. I have enjoyed seeing them at conferences, in the hallway and have especially enjoyed getting to know them through the various articles I have written.

As I have seen the students, faculty and staff learn the Healer’s art, I have been able to have my testimony strengthened of the love that the Savior has for each of us. As I have tried to learn medical terms, I am reminded of how amazing God’s creations are. My internship has allowed my relationship with my Savior and my Heavenly Father to be strengthened.

I will always remember my internship experience with fondness. Thank you to all of the nursing alumni, students, staff, faculty and donors who have been so kind to me! Words cannot adequately express the gratitude I have felt while working here. Thank you College of Nursing for the opportunity to work here!

Fulbright Scholar Award: Dr. Sheri Palmer

By Mindy Longhurst

20181022_114839_HDRAn image of teaching professor Dr. Sheri Palmer with people from the National University of Asuncion. Image courtesy of Palmer.

Teaching professor Dr. Sheri Palmer has had an incredible year spending time in Paraguay for two significant nursing projects including a Fulbright Scholar Award.

Studying teenage pregnancy in Paraguay

This past August, Palmer with two other faculty members and five nursing students went to Paraguay on a research project to learn more about teenage pregnancy in Paraguay.

Palmer first came to love the people of Paraguay while serving a welfare mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints shortly after receiving her RN license thirty years ago. Since her time in Paraguay as a missionary, she has had a strong desire to go back and serve the people that she loves. While pondering this, Palmer came in contact with a nursing student named Rachel Trujillo who also served a mission for the Church in Paraguay. As they discussed their love for the people, Trujillo remembered the high teenage pregnancy rate in Paraguay and wanted to do something to help. She discussed this with Palmer and they decided to get a research team together to learn more about the teenage pregnancy rate in Paraguay.

(Watch a video about Trujillo and Palmer deciding on what to research in Paraguay https://youtu.be/BKjP1zyPqY0)

To study the teenage pregnancy, the students and professors went to Paraguay to interview local leaders and teachers about what might be contributing to the high rate of teenage pregnancy. Of these interviews, nursing student Julia Lee says, “We asked what is the frequency of teenage pregnancy here, what risk factors contribute to a teenager getting pregnant, what is happening now to prevent or reduce teenage pregnancy, and what suggestions does this person have to reduce teenage pregnancy.”

(Watch a video about the interview process https://youtu.be/nCzNfEdv7rY)

While they were in the schools in Cerrito, they would teach the girls from ages 8+ about maturation and sex education. They also provided each of the girls with a Days for Girls kit. This kit included underwear with built in washable pads so that the girls would be able to be clean during their menstrual cycle. Third semester nursing student Cortney Welch says, “I think teaching Days for Girls was really beneficial to those we were able to reach out to.” Trujillo expounds, “I think it will make a big difference, especially since our guides are now going around with Sheri, teaching the curriculum to other people. It has been cool because we have left other people in place to continue the legacy.”

(Watch a video about the Days for Girls program https://youtu.be/KA46WPHvqK8)

The 10 day research experience for the nursing students and faculty members was a great experience! Megan Hancock says, “I loved it! The entire time I was there I felt blessed to be there. It was nice knowing that what we are doing would lead to interventions that actually work because we were researching what is and what is not working.”

Fulbright Scholar Award

For six weeks from mid-October to the beginning of December Palmer was able to stay in Paraguay to help teach the nurses, teachers and students about nursing with her Fulbright Scholar Award. The Fulbright Scholar Award allows Palmer to be a visiting scholar to the national university in Paraguay (National University of Asuncion). Palmer was able to teach nursing classes to faculty members and students of the college in five different cities. She was able to teach at the Paraguayan Nursing Association, at private hospitals, public hospitals and at the Ministry of Health.

20181022_154935An image of Palmer with other medical professionals in Paraguay. Image courtesy of Palmer.

This is the first round of a two year experience in Paraguay for the Fulbright Scholar Award. The second round will be next March and April and the third round will be sometime in 2020. Going back and helping the Paraguayan people over the course of two years will help Palmer to make the biggest difference possible.

The love that Palmer has for the people of Paraguay is so evident, she lights up when she speaks about the people she has met while there. When Palmer would introduce herself and start her classes in Paraguay she would always try to explain the love that she and others have for the Paraguayan people. She explains, “Almost every time I was able to tell them about my mission, I would tell them that they were important. Just being able to express my love for them. It was neat to let them know that people think about you and care for you. We want the best for you.”

Palmer wants all of the nurses in Paraguay to feel empowered and to know that they are affecting so many lives. She says, “Empowering nurses is so important. One of the reasons I was there was to help empower the nurses, help their value of nursing to be greater in the country, to be looked upon as a worthy profession.” When she left the different cities she was teaching in, she did not realize the impact that she would have on others, just like the nurses in Paraguay do not always understand the impact they have on others.

Palmer is currently preparing for her next phase of the Fulbright Scholar Award. Palmer is eagerly looking forward to her next return to Paraguay!

To read more about Palmer’s experiences with her Fulbright Scholar Award read her blog https://palmerfulbrightinparaguay.wordpress.com/.