Author Archives: College of Nursing Media Team

Honoring Veterans on a Utah Honor Flight

By Mindy Longhurst

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An image of Sandra Rogers and Mary Williams with their veterans before leaving for Washington D.C. Image courtesy of Rogers.

Once a year, the College of Nursing sponsors a Utah Honor Flight. An Honor Flight is meant to recognize and show appreciation for those who have served and sacrificed for our country. During this experience, these veterans are each assigned a guardian to take care of them. The veterans fly from Salt Lake City to Washington D.C. where they are able to look at many historical and memorial sites for the wars they served in.

This year, we had nursing students and faculty members participate in the Utah Honor Flight. Also in attendance was Sandra Rogers, the International Vice President for Brigham Young University. Rogers is the former dean and nursing alum of the College of Nursing.

Both Rogers and associate professor Dr. Mary Williams had uncles who made the ultimate sacrifice giving their lives in the service of their country. Because of these experiences, both were raised in homes where gratitude and appreciation for those who have served our country were readily expressed.

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An image of Rogers with others at the WWII Memorial at the Washington Mall. Image courtesy of Rogers.

Sandra Rogers’ experience

During their time in Washington D.C., the veterans and guardians were able to visit many historical and memorial sites. They first visited the National Archives Museum, where the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights are showcased. Rogers explains how impactful this was for the veterans, “I did not anticipate how much the veterans appreciated seeing the archives. It was like it was in their patriotic DNA, it was part of one of the reasons why they had served. These were the documents that set out the freedoms that they were defending and what they were fighting for.”

Following the National Archives Museum, they attended the WWII Memorial where Congressional Contingency from Utah were there to greet the veterans and express their appreciation. While in Washington D.C., they also visited the Lincoln Memorial, the Vietnam Memorial, the Korean Memorial, Fort McHenry where Francis Scott Key penned “The Star Spangled Banner” and they were able to attend the Arlington National Cemetery.

Throughout her experience with the Utah Honor Flight, Sandra Rogers was constantly amazed by the organization and efficiency of the program. There was always someone to help with food and travel. She was impressed with teaching professor Dr. Kent Blad who organizes the event for the College of Nursing global and public health nursing course practicum. Being a veteran himself, Blad has a love for those who have served this country, and that was evident throughout the entire experience.

The ultimate lesson that Rogers was able to learn was about the importance of gratitude. It surprised her during the Honor Flight experience how complete strangers would come up to the veterans and individually thank them for the service and sacrifice they made for this country. She was amazed by the crowds of people in the airports with signs and banners cheering for the veterans. She says, “I looked at these veterans on the bus and I thought about the families that worried about them, the families that prayed for them while they were gone, the families that hoped heaven would watch over their loved one while they were providing this service.” After this experience, she now says that she is more motivated to approach a veteran and ask where they served and to give thanks for their service.

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Image of Williams and Rogers and their veterans at the Korean War Memorial at the Washington Mall. Image courtesy of Rogers.

Mary Williams’ experience

Williams loved the experience that she had during the Utah Honor flight! A moment that she remembers clearly is when the veteran for whom she was guardian visited the Lincoln Memorial. Her veteran served in the Korean War and is an artist. He really wanted to observe the artistic beauty of the Lincoln Memorial. She says of this experience, “At the Lincoln Memorial, my veteran was so desirous to view the Lincoln Memorial. That day the elevators were broken, but he was determined to climb the many steps to the top so he could experience the memorial and he did so with great energy.”

Williams expressed how life-changing this experience was for her. She was able to take the time to learn about their war stories and to learn about their lives. She says, “My life has been changed forever. I was again reminded that freedom is not free. The price for freedom is paid with blood, tears, loss of life and sacrifice of families. I was indeed overwhelmed with gratitude for the men and women who sacrifice so much. Truly, this experience was one of the highlights of my life with love of country and freedom etched on my heart forever and gratitude for those who keep it free never to be forgotten.”

 

 

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Nursing Students’ Posters Win International Competition

By Quincey Taylor

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Caitlin Ferderber presenting her poster at the conference. Photo courtesy of Ferderber

BYU nursing students Chelsea Van Wagenen and Caitlin Ferderber had the chance to attend the International Association of Forensic Nurses Conference of 2018. Held in Reno, Nevada from October 24 to 27, these students mingled with top tier Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) of the nation. Each student entered a medical poster they had created to be judged, informing viewers about a certain topic within SANE nursing. They represented BYU well, bringing home not only first place but also a second place win.

Van Wagenen entered a poster informing viewers about strangulation during sexual assault:

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Judges were impressed with the poster and the high quality research. Van Wagenen’s entry won second place.

She enjoyed the conference and says about the experience, “I just have felt very blessed to have the opportunity to go and participate in this conference as an undergrad. The conference was an amazing opportunity to learn about SANE nursing. It made me realize that there is so much more out there to learn and the importance of continuing to educate ourselves beyond nursing school. The conference also made me realize the impact research has on nursing and how it is important to stay up-to-date on the current practices.”

Ferderber’s poster educated viewers about characteristics of male sexual assault victims, and won first place.

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She comments on the experience, “I was just honored to have been accepted to present my poster and hadn’t expected to win anything for it. I also felt extremely grateful to have been able to work with Julie Valentine, Leslie Miles, and Linda Mabey on their study. They are amazing, and I have learned so much from working with them.”

Ferderber explains about her choice of topic she put on her poster, “One of the major differences we found between female and male victims was that males are more likely to be assaulted by a stranger or person in authority. Men are also less likely to have a CODIS eligible profile developed, which can hurt their case if they decide to prosecute. I really enjoyed the conference and learned more about forensic nursing as well as how to better care for victims of sexual assault. The ugly truth is that sexual assault, abuse, and other forms of violence are far too common. I hope to take what I’ve learned and apply it to my practice so that I can help victims as they go through these traumatic experiences.”

Student Spotlight: Angela Nickerl

By Mindy Longhurst

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Image of Angela Nickerl with a girl from her Ghana public and global health nursing course practicum. Image courtesy of Nickerl.

Being a non-traditional student (a student 30 years of age and older) at BYU can sometimes be challenging. But, College of Nursing fifth semester student, Angela Nickerl loves the experiences she has had as a non-traditional student. Nickerl is older than most BYU students, but loves the opportunity to share the wisdom she has gained throughout her life.

Ever since Nickerl was in high school she knew that she wanted to become a nurse. She says, “Throughout my experience being a mother in healthcare, I noticed that the nurses made a huge difference and impact on their patients.” Nickerl’s journey to becoming a nurse was very spiritual. She loves to learn about the body. Taking care of someone who is sick is a spiritual experience that brings her closer to God.

Nickerl started taking some nursing prerequisite courses while her family was living in California several years ago. When her family decided to move to Utah, she was able to apply to BYU and the nursing program and was accepted into both.

familyAn image of Nickerl’s children. Image courtesy of Nickerl.

At the time that she started at BYU (January 2016) three of her children were going to college. Now, all five of Nickerl’s children are currently going to college. This helps Nickerl to be able to relate more to her children. Nickerl explains, “It is interesting having my children in school with me at the same time. It can be stressful because we are all stressed about midterms and finals at the same time. But, this has helped me to be able to relate to my children so much more!”

Overall, Nickerl has enjoyed her time within the nursing program. She expounds, “I love the nursing program at BYU! Often in the middle of a busy semester it is difficult to find positive things because you’re tired. However, in spite of being tired, one of my favorite parts of the program is that our professors truly embrace our school motto, learning the Healer’s art. We are taught that in every setting, we should care for people the way the Savior would. Reading a nursing textbook and studying for the NCLEX is going to be the same regardless of where you study, but at BYU we are taught our nursing skills from a different perspective. Not only are we encouraged to view our patients differently, but our professors model it by treating us that way. I think they are phenomenal examples of what they teach about the Savior.”

group photoImage of Nickerl with other nursing students. Image courtesy of Nickerl.

Nickerl has some advice for those who are non-traditional students. She says, “Being a non-traditional student, I feel like I value what I am learning more because it really is my choice to be here. Sometimes when you are younger you do it because it is the social norm. As someone older, this is not the right thing I am supposed to be doing with my life. A lot of people are often surprised when they find out that I am a college student. I am grateful for the things that I am learning, because I am choosing to be here.”

Another lesson she has learned is the importance of balancing her schedule. She explains, “If you absolutely know that you are supposed to be doing school and you know that the Lord is supporting you in it, then it all fits. If you are doing what the Lord wants you to do, if you are putting your priorities in order, if you are attending the temple, serving in your church calling, if you are putting your family time first, then Heavenly Father makes it fit. That is something that I have felt over and over again. And I feel like my relationship with the Savior has been strengthened as a result of nursing school.”

In the future, Nickerl hopes to become an oncology nurse.

 

Experiencing the Czech Republic

By Mindy Longhurst

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The 2018 Czech Republic public and global health nursing course practicum class.

College of Nursing students at Brigham Young University are able to learn more about the Czech Republic’s healthcare system during the Czech Republic public and global health nursing course practicum. For three and a half weeks the nursing students are able to learn and experience the Czech Republic. Formerly a part of communist Czechoslovakia (a satellite state of the Soviet Union), the Czech Republic and its healthcare system have undergone dramatic changes since the country became independent in 1993. The healthcare system is socialized, so it is required for all citizens of the Czech Republic to have health insurance.

Assistant teaching professor, Petr Ruda, is a native of the Czech Republic. He loves the opportunity to be able to teach the nursing students about the culture and let them experience elements of his home country. He explains, “The overall experience was great! All of the students were excited to try new things and be exposed to new environments and cultures. They were able to learn about traditions and learn about the memorials that we visited.”

One of the biggest challenges for the students is the language barrier. Ruda expounds, “The language is difficult, it is a Slavic language. In the bigger cities most people speak English, then we go to the medium sized city where they speak less English, we end at a small village where there is not a lot of people who speak English fluently.” This can sometimes make it difficult for the students to fully understand what is happening. But, this amazing opportunity allows the nursing students to be able to depend on their smiles and gestures to explain what they are doing and how they are feeling. Relying on their nonverbal skills teaches the nursing students the importance of body language, a vital way to express communication.

ptr 2.0Assistant teaching professor, Petr Ruda, in the Czech Republic.

While in the Czech Republic the students work closely with the local nurses and are able to learn more about the complementary and alternative medicine treatments that are used regularly in the Czech Republic. Ruda says, “As part of the health insurance, you can qualify to receive a coupon or receive paperwork for a special treatment. The treatment is done in localized, special clinics. What that means, if you have really bad asthma, you may be advised by your primary care provider to spend some time in a certain area that is specialized for asthma patients.”

For the first time this past spring, the 10 students on the Czech Republic public and global health nursing course practicum were able to attend the Auschwitz concentration camp from WWII. This experience was able to give the students a greater perspective and taught them more about the holocaust. Ruda explains, “We go to help our students understand what has happened and how to stop it from happening again. Auschwitz was the darkest place I have ever seen and experienced. Auschwitz and the holocaust needs to be told and explained to the nursing students. It needs to be taught and shared so this never happens again. The concentration camps still effect those who are in the Czech Republic.”

Another experience that these students are able to receive is the ability to teach the nurses and local nursing students about the healthcare in the United States. Compared to the United States, the nurses in the Czech Republic are understaffed. One student says, “The biggest difference we saw was a lack of nurses. And the nurses who were there had huge workloads and appeared to be underpaid.” In the United States, the nurses have more flexibility in patient care, while in the Czech Republic nurses are more restricted on patient care.

Getting to know a different culture helped the students not only to gain perspective on different countries’ healthcare systems but also to appreciate its citizens, customs and historical events. The students and faculty members who are able to attend the Czech Republic public and global health nursing course practicum, leave the country feeling like they better understand a different culture and are grateful for the many different experiences they had.

University Launches SafeWalk Feature on BYU App

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By Quincey Taylor

When I came to BYU, it was the first time that I found myself walking home alone in the dark. I had always had a car when I lived with my parents, so to be all by myself in a new environment was somewhat intimidating, especially as an 18 year old girl. I had an evening class and had to walk across campus every night to my apartment in Helaman Halls. Nothing scary or dangerous ever happened to me, but it would have made a huge difference to feel safe as I was walking to and from class at night.

BYU is one of the safest college campuses in the nation. According to Business Insider, an American business news website, BYU was ranked the number one safest college campus in the nation of 2016.* While number of assaults on BYU campus is low compared to other universities, unfortunate things still happen. It is sometimes difficult for victims to feel there is help in those vulnerable moments.

To address this concern of many BYU students, a team of students on the BYUSA Student Council set out to develop and launch a mobile service to help students feel safer. In the past, students were able to call a Safewalk hotline and be physically escorted home by a police officer. However, it is impossible for officers to walk all 33,000 students home. This feature was created as a “virtual escort” so that each student that wanted to take advantage of this service is able to. Launched during the 2017 fall semester, this app allows the BYU Police Department to monitor your location to ensure you reach your destination safely. It was even featured on Campus Security and Life Safety, a magazine focusing on efforts schools are making to become safer.

Follow these steps to try it out today:

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SafeWalk is a new feature on the BYU mobile app. To find it, click “Add Features” and select it from the list. You will need to click “Launch.” I tried it out on a stroll across campus and it was easy to use. It is important to read all the instructions in order to get the best use from the app. You will be asked to confirm your phone number to ensure they have the correct one.

 

 

 

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Next, you specify your destination by clicking on the map and setting a pin. Click “Confirm Destination” and your location will begin to be monitored by the BYU Police. You will receive a confirmation text to ensure that it is working.

 

 

 

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As you walk, your screen will show a red circle that, if clicked, will call the BYU Police immediately. Please do NOT close the app without ending your Safewalk session or the police will dispatch someone to check on you. Once you have reached your destination, click “I’ve Arrived Safely” to end the Safewalk. You will receive a text stating that your location is no longer being tracked.

Lt. Steven Messick with the BYU Police Department says about the new feature, “I think we live in a time where the need may be just the fact that we’re able to do it, and maybe there’s been a need for a long, long time, for this type of thing. We can do it now, we know how to do it and so why shouldn’t we use that to make BYU a safer place?” So, if you are ever uneasy or even just curious, try it out! You can never be too careful, even on a campus like BYU.

 

*See link for Business Insider article: https://www.businessinsider.com/safest-college-campuses-in-america-2016-1

Peery Film Festival: College Hosts Films for Students

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By Quincey Taylor

Starting on Friday, November 2, the BYU College of Nursing is hosting two different films during the Peery Film Festival. Both will be free of charge. It will be a great opportunity for students to get together and support their university, as well as a fun time enjoying high quality films about the medical field.

To start off, there will be a showing of Leave No Trace on Friday, November 2 at 5:45 p.m. at the Varsity Theater. This film received great reviews, including 100% on Rotten Tomatoes. It tells the true story of a father and daughter that lived for four years undetected in Forest Park, a beautiful nature reserve in Oregon. After being discovered, they must assimilate into normal society, a task made difficult by the veteran father’s PTSD and inability to function around other people. This film is extremely relevant for students to understand the difficulties that veterans, as well as their children, face and how nurses can help as healthcare administrators.

The following week on Tuesday, November 6, the college is hosting a showing of Shout Gladi, Gladi – a  2015 documentary about efforts to help African women suffering with obstetric fistula. It will show at 5:30 in room 1060 of the HBLL. This medical condition, which is caused during childbirth, consists of damage to the bladder that severely inhibits women’s urinary control. An estimated two million women in Africa contract obstetric fistula during labor per year. These women are often rejected by society and live in isolation. This debilitating condition can be completely cured with simple medical procedures, which are easily available in developed countries. The documentary—filmed in Kenya, Malawi, and Sierra Leone and narrated by Meryl Streep—follows the story of nurses who make a push to eradicate the condition and save these distressed women. These women are released not only from a life of bodily suffering, but also reintroduced into society as newly independent individuals.

Both events are free. For other dates and times available check out peeryfilms.byu.edu.

DAISY Award Winner: Bret Lyman

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Bret Lyman with award. Photo courtesy of Zak Gowans.

By Quincey Taylor

The DAISY Foundation is a non-profit organization, established in 1999, by the family of Patrick Barnes. Barnes passed away from complications of an autoimmune disease called Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura at the age of 33. Before he passed, his family saw the dedicated service and kindness offered to him by the nurses responsible for him. After his death, the Barnes family founded DAISY—an acronym for Diseases Attacking the Immune System—to honor their son and express gratitude to exceptional nurses around the world.

The DAISY Award is given to a faculty member at the BYU College of Nursing twice a year. Assistant professor Dr. Bret Lyman was nominated and selected to receive the award this fall semester. He teaches the capstone course and the undergraduate ethics course. Students are profoundly impacted by his dedication to truly learning the Healer’s art and teaching that to his pupils.

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Bret Lyman and his family. Photo courtesy of Zak Gowans.

In the nomination, one student described Lyman as “fully invested in bettering healthcare through both improving the hospital system in his research and molding compassionate nurses in his teaching.” The student told the story of how during their capstone semester, his or her financial aid fell through and he or she became homeless. The student described Lyman’s compassionate service, how he “took the time to listen and was able to connect with the college to find resources so I could finish. This is when I really understood that he cares about the success of his students. Teaching is not just a job for him.”

As this story illustrates, Bret Lyman truly practices the Healer’s art. Lyman finds inspiration from the Savior, and says, “I think when we keep the Master Healer, Jesus Christ, in mind it will keep us grounded. He helps us move past some of our personal imperfections and personal struggles. You know that He is going to be there to help cover that gap between what we can do with our best effort and what needs to be done.”

Watch the video to learn more: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4vHTW2M0ak