Monthly Archives: September 2019

Nursing Students Win the Golden Ticket: Fazer Chocolate Factory

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Everyone was overjoyed! Who doesn’t love a chocolate surprise? Photo courtesy of Miles.

When associate teaching professor Dr. Leslie Miles and adjunct faculty member Curt Newman took their students to the Fazer Chocolate Factory tour during the Finland section of the clinical practicum for the public and global health nursing course, little did they know that they would be met with an exciting surprise!

After taking their students to the factory for years, they had become well-known among the tour guides. They were told that this year they would be the 500,000th visitors of the Fazer Factory, and as a reward would be receiving two giant-sized candy bars! They were asked if they would be okay posing for some photos, and they delivered!

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Ready to dig in to their chocolate feast! Photo courtesy of Miles.

Miles was elated and says, “[Curt] was just, like, beside himself. And I will confess I was jumping up and down. It was like winning the golden ticket in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory!”

The group also received a considerable discount on the chocolate purchased, and the students were quick to put it to good use.

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Everyone made good use of their chocolate discount! Notice someone in the window? Photo courtesy of Miles.

Finding Joy in the Journey: Welcome to New Faculty Member Marc-Aurel Martial

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The Martial family is happy when they are together. 

By Quincey Taylor

Welcome to one the newest college faculty members: assistant professor Dr. Marc-Aurel Martial! Born to some of the first church members in Haiti, married to his college sweetheart, and father of three children whose ages range from 21 to 2, Marc adds a light to the college that fellow faculty and students thoroughly enjoy. Even though he has had some trials in his life, he sees these as an opportunity to learn and rely wholly upon the Lord.

Marc came to the United States when he was around 17 years old. One of his heroes, the mission president of the Port-Au-Prince mission in Haiti from 1991 through 1996, was named Fitzner André Joseph. Joseph always treated Marc with respect, and inspired him to consider serving a mission. He followed Joseph’s advice and served in the Ivory Coast Abidjan mission.

After returning home, Joseph and his wife helped Marc with the application process to come to the United States and attend Rick’s College. Marc’s family came together to sponsor him and he started his journey. He eventually transferred to BYU and applied for the nursing program in 1998.

Marc met his future wife, Paka, when the two were at BYU. He knew marrying her was the right choice after he saw Paka and his mother interact. Even though they didn’t share a common language (Marc’s mother spoke Haitian Creole) they connected and became friends. They were later married in 2001 and continued with their education – Paka in statistics and Marc in nursing.

The road to having children was not an easy one for Marc and Paka, a road that included infertility and eventual adoption. Although the heartache was always present, they filled their pre-parenthood years with good deeds and experiences. They did humanitarian work, continued in their careers, and bought a house.

Throughout the years, different friends and family members would suggest adoption, but the Martials weren’t ready yet. They were holding out hope that they would be able to have children biologically. However, in 2009, they decided to submit their application for adoption. Only a month and a half later, the process quickened when they met with the birth mom of their future son. In September of that year, Dahiren was born and became a part of the Martial family.

Although suddenly becoming parents was slightly overwhelming, the Martials found support in their community, church, and family. Little did they know that their family was only beginning the process of growth.

The next year, they heard about the devastating 7.0 earthquake that hit the island of Haiti. A friend of theirs from the church had passed away, and her 12-year-old son, named Levi, was being cared for by the bishop of the ward. His only living immediate relative was his older sister, who was currently attending BYU-Idaho.

Marc and Paka contacted the sister, wanting to know her desire for her brother. She wanted him to come to the United States to be closer to her, so the Martials started to try and find a way to make that happen.

After jumping through legal hoops for ten months, Levi finally came to the US under the Martials’ guardianship. Two years later, Levi asked to be sealed to the family eternally. Fast forward to today, and Marc describes Levi as “the leader of our children; he is a good example, caring and loving.” He is currently attending BYU.

However, the Martial family wasn’t complete yet. In the summer of 2016, Paka found out the wonderful news that she was expecting. Nine months later, she gave birth to a baby girl they named Dahlia. Marc laughs, “She’s the center of the universe.” Dahlia, who is now two and a half, brings so much light and excitement to the family.

Marc and Paka were worried that Dahlia might forget about Levi when he left on his two-year mission, but since the change where families can FaceTime with their missionaries every week, their relationship blossomed. They’ve definitely seen the prophet’s promise when he said this change would strengthen family bonds.

Marc loves to play racquetball and soccer, and enjoys more time to do so after finishing his PhD. He keeps an avid journal and recommends the practice to everyone.

 

A Year for the Books: Welcome to New Faculty Member Noreen Oeding

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By Quincey Taylor

This past year has been a doozy for new faculty member assistant teaching professor Dr. Noreen Oeding. She became a BYU nursing professor and a new mother of a baby boy.

Motherhood has opened Oeding’s eyes to a new perspective on infants. Even though she has worked in the newborn intensive care unit of Utah Valley Hospital for ten years, she is still learning every day. Oeding was born in Provo when her parents were BYU students, in that exact hospital. She jokes, “I didn’t go very far in life.”

Her son, who just hit eight months, pushes Oeding to grow. She says, “It’s been the best and probably the hardest thing I’ve ever done.” She continues, “It took me by surprise. I had been a neonatal nurse for years and am recently a neonatal nurse practitioner , and was confident I knew how to take care of babies. But it’s been a completely unexpected experience – a beautiful and delightful surprise!”

She will tell you that her associate’s and bachelor’s degrees from Brigham Young University–Idaho in 2010 prepared her well for future opportunities, including motherhood. As a student, she worked in the university’s student health center and was an active participant with the campus student wellness committee.

Oeding and her husband, Matthew, got to know each other one night when her neighbor called at 11pm. The woman had fallen out of her wheelchair and, knowing Oeding was a nurse, called for help. Oeding says, “Lo and behold, guess who helped me get her back into her wheelchair but my future husband!” They had been in the same ward for years. It was after that experience that they started to see each other in a new light. She says, “I look back and think if it hadn’t been for nursing and that situation, who knows what would have happened? Nursing solves everything!”

Oeding has also lived in Arizona and Idaho, where she went to school at BYU-Idaho. She never dreamed that she would be at BYU as a faculty member, and had to join the freshmen this year in learning the layout of campus.

She describes the faculty application process as a “sweet experience.” She had just graduated with her doctorate from Creighton University in 2018 and decided to apply on a whim. She knew Cara Wiley from a previous ward and had been the medical assistant of teaching professor Dr. Kent Blad many years prior, so she hoped that they would be able to give her some good advice. She came to campus to see if there were any openings. She says, “As luck would have it, I came in and nobody was there. It was a Tuesday and everything was closed during devotional. As I was leaving the Kimball Tower, I saw Cara walking up and I got to talk to her. It was just perfect, perfect timing.” Wiley took her resume and recommended she email Dean Ravert.

Even though she was nearing the end of her pregnancy during the interview process, Oeding kept her wits about her and passed with flying colors.

This summer she was able to join associate teaching professor Dr. Peggy Anderson in the vulnerable populations section of the clinical practicum for the public and global health nursing course. It was eye-opening to learn about refugees as well as incarcerated populations in Utah. Oeding says that being at BYU provides an opportunity for faculty and students to learn, grow, and teach each other while utilizing the Spirit and power of God to seek truth and knowledge. It is also an opportunity to excel and challenge each other to grow mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually.

Oeding and her husband enjoy traveling, and have already had a chance to take their son on trips with them. He loves socializing, a “complete extrovert” according to Oeding, so the airplane ended up being a great experience for him.

When asked what her favorite trip she’s ever taken, Oeding is reminded of a neonatal conference in Florida she was asked to go to. She would be apart from her then boyfriend for a week, which she wasn’t looking forward to. Once she flew down to Florida, her future husband surprised her at the resort she was staying at with a bouquet of flowers! He delivered them to her door. “What a keeper,” she remarks.

Oeding is excited to continue to be challenged and try new things. Who knows what the next year has in store?

Student Spotlight: Lexy Rowberry

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Rowberry loves spending time with her family. Photo courtesy of Rowberry.

By Corbin Smith

Well, students. Here we are again. Another school year has kicked off with new opportunities to grow and serve. There will be late-night study sessions and last-minute cramming for tests, but you will also learn so many new things, as well as meeting new friends along the way. One of those new friends that you may meet as you walk the halls of the Kimball Tower this year is a 5th-semester student named Lexy Rowberry.

As a young girl, Rowberry never imagined that she would be studying nursing here at BYU. Her family is full of teachers so Rowberry, planning to follow in the footsteps of her family, had always imagined herself studying something like English or education. It was when her mom suggested nursing while she was applying for college that Rowberry first considered the idea of pursuing nursing at BYU.

Her road to becoming a nurse started long before that day, though.

When Rowberry was young, her father got a job in Australia which moved the entire family to a small town in the middle of Australia. “It was terrifying. I never did anything,” Rowberry says, laughing, of her experience. Being in a new place around new people was tough and forced Rowberry to see the world in a new way. “Living with different people got me outside myself. I saw that there was another way to live life!” she says. This realization was the start of Rowberry’s desire to serve and make life better for all people, no matter how. “I saw others and thought, I’d really like to do something in my life to help be a source for good,” she explains.

As she was growing up, Rowberry had another impactful experience that shifted her outlook on life. Not very many of us have to deal with the stress and uncertainty that comes with having someone with cancer in your family. Even those who do, usually aren’t faced with that at a young age. Nonetheless, that is exactly what Rowberry had to deal with as a young girl.

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Photo courtesy of Rowberry.

While in Australia, just as Rowberry’s dad was called as bishop of their ward, her mom was diagnosed with cancer. What would you do? How would you react? Many young people might close themselves off and blame others for the scary things that are happening. Rowberry did the exact opposite. “It was then when I really turned to my Heavenly Father. It changed me to really trust him and say, ‘Life is serious. I’ll do whatever you want me to do. It’s going to be okay’,” she says.

It was then when Rowberry started to become the smiley, upbeat and happy person that she is today. Her testimony of God and positive outlook on life has given her the ability to overcome the trials that have come into her life at every point in her life. “Being happy just makes everything so much better,” she explains, “Life is better when you’re happy.” Now, when you see Rowberry in the hall, you’re bound to see a smile that goes from ear to ear!

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Photo courtesy of Rowberry.

This positive attitude that Rowberry has developed has helped her be successful in each semester of the nursing program. Whether you are just starting your first semester or are reaching the end of your BYU career, here are three pieces of advice from Rowberry to have a great and rewarding semester this year:

  1. “Put your foot in a lot of places” – Try new things this semester! Join a new club, pick up a new hobby or read a new (non-textbook) book! Studying is grueling so try to forget about school every once in a while so you can relax!
  2. Enjoy learning – You are learning the Healer’s art! Enjoy the process of learning and making mistakes. Don’t worry too much at being perfect at everything at the start and do your best to slow things down and enjoy the process!
  3. Focus on why you’re there – Everyone has their own answer to the question “Why nursing?”. Make sure you remember your “why”! When school gets stressful it is hard to remember why, so write your “why” down where you will always see it and each time you sit in class or at your desk to study, keep that “why” in mind!

 

As Rowberry starts her senior year she is excited to continue learning and applying what she has learned in past semesters and in the clinical practicum for her Public and Global health nursing course last summer. Make sure, when you see her in the halls this year, to give her a smile and a high-five!

 

Airplanes and Game-Shows. Welcome to BYU, Denise Cummins!

DeniseBy Corbin Smith

Listen up all you travel-junkies and game show fanatics! New faculty member Denise Cummins (AS ’86) is someone you have to meet!

For the inner adventurer in you, you can go ask Cummins about the more than 10 countries that she has visited in her lifetime! She has gone places like England (where she was born), Belgium, Morocco, the Mediterranean and more! Wherever she goes she loves to kayak and visit historical sites! Go ask her about the tons of experiences she has had all over the world!

For you lovers of games such as Jeopardy and The Price is Right, along with dreamers to one day compete on a program like that, Cummins can be your guide! Years ago, while living in Los Angeles as a newlywed, she competed on three game shows! She played Million Dollar Chance of a Lifetime, Secret Password and The Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour and racked up some sweet prizes! For those who want to follow in her footsteps, she is the one to talk too!

Cummins life, however, is more than traveling to exotic places and playing game shows. “It is amazing to make a difference in someone’s life. You truly can make a big impact through being a loving and caring nurse,” she says. Cummins loves being able to serve people and make their lives happier each day!

This semester Cummins is teaching Nursing 320, 351 and 352. She is so excited to work with BYU students and faculty this year!

 

To learn more about Cummins, read her official bio below!

 

When it comes to gaining an education, Denise Cummins (AS ’83) is not hesitant about traveling afar. She came from England after joining the Church to attend BYU, where she earned her first nursing degree. She has lived in California since graduating but has earned additional degrees and credentials from BYU–Idaho, Frontier Nursing University in Kentucky, the University of Sheffield in England and, most recently, from the University of Utah, where she completed a doctoral program in nursing.

The traveling continues! Within weeks of starting her BYU position, she and another nursing professor took a group of nursing students to India, working with a Hindu organization and caring for families affected by leprosy as part of the clinical practicum for the public and global health nursing course.

Cummins’s professional experience is just as unique. After becoming a registered nurse, she cared for women and babies in a variety of settings, including small community hospitals, a large university teaching hospital, a midwife clinic, and even a mobile health van. Later, after becoming a nurse practitioner, she supervised a hospital-based maternal-fetal medicine clinic, serving women with high-risk pregnancies, and coordinated its perinatal research program. Most recently, Cummins was the director of quality and regulatory compliance for a rural hospital district, while concurrently teaching an online nursing research class for BYU–Idaho.

She considers her undergraduate education at BYU to be one of the great privileges of her life. It prepared her not only for a career in nursing but to live a life and raise a family centered on the gospel of Jesus Christ. As a new faculty member, she is excited and honored to help students prepare for these experiences in their own lives. After entering BYU to learn, then going forth to serve, she is pleased to return to teach. Cummins currently instructs the nursing care of women and newborns course and clinical labs, and scholarly inquiry in nursing.

When she is not in the hospital or teaching, you will find her traveling between California and Utah, where much of her family still resides.

Welcoming New Faculty Member Brandon Thatcher

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Realizing that teaching seminary may not pay the bills but wanting to use spirituality and helping others to make a difference in a career, assistant teaching professor Brandon Thatcher earned a bachelor of art in Spanish from Utah State University as a prerequisite for a fast track nursing program. He then earned a bachelor’s degree in 2009 and a master’s degree in 2013—both in nursing from the University of Utah.

Before becoming a board-certified psychiatric/mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP), he worked for five years as the charge nurse for both the child and adolescent inpatient units at the University Neuropsychiatric Institute in Salt Lake City. As a PMHNP, he worked in various settings including a psychiatric crisis center, several substance use disorder treatment centers, therapeutic boarding schools, and at the BYU Student Health Center on an outpatient basis.

Thatcher has also been an adjunct clinical instructor for the BYU College of Nursing since 2014. He recently teamed up with professor emerita Dr. Barbara Heise for a publication on child suicide screening methods.

He currently teaches the stress management course, preview to nursing course, and the psych/mental health nursing class and clinical. During the 2019 spring term, he accompanied another professor and ten nursing students in Ghana, Africa, as part of the clinical practicum for the public and global health nursing course.

Employment at the university lets him include a spiritual side to healthcare when teaching students. He values the religious aspects that can be added to mental health discussion and healing. As a practitioner with the student health center, he saw the Lord’s hand in many things. “When a student required a few or many additional minutes for a session, the subsequent time slots would always cancel, allowing the time we needed. This happened in every instance I needed more time with my patients for three and a half years,” he shares.

He and his wife, Danina, have three children. He enjoys family time most of all, playing guitar, wrestling kids (his own), watercolor painting, and spending time outdoors.