Enrichment in Education, Part Four: Simulation is the Sincerest Form of Flattery

This story is part of an ongoing series about the BYU College of Nursing’s Mary Jane Rawlinson Geertsen Nursing Learning Center and the College’s constant efforts to update it.

This past summer, sixteen BYU College of Nursing faculty and staff received three days of intensive simulation training. The process, one could say, has modeled a path to success for any nursing college.

The course, offered by Intermountain Healthcare and hosted at LDS Hospital, was tailored specifically to the needs of BYU staff. It was in part the brainchild of assistant teaching professor Stacie Hunsaker, who, after six years of working with simulation, felt that it would be beneficial to standardize the training that college employees received.

“They held a course for us, and it was great because as a team we were able to experience specific issues to our simulation and work on very specific items related to BYU nursing, so it was really helpful for us to be there as a team,” Hunsaker says.

After receiving a thick binder full of notes, the teachers were taught important ideas about using simulation in instruction, including the need for establishing good communication between students and helping them get engaged in the activities.

“By going to that course, all of us were able to get that same consistent information, so now we can hopefully provide a better experience for the students of all semesters who participate in simulation,” Hunsaker says.

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NLC Supervisor Colleen Tingey works with other staff to practice simulation drills intended to benefit students.

Part of the process was participating in and creating scenarios; it was as though the teachers became the students as they practice different situations and were critiqued on how they performed. Staff also worked to implement new ideas into existing simulations as well as develop new ones for this year’s teaching.

“We were able as groups to develop objectives for all of our simulations and then put them into consistent formats throughout all semesters,” Hunsaker says. “So now we have all of them set up so that they’ll have a prebrief, a simulation, and a debriefing moment.”

Getting everyone on the same page was a key motivator to implement the training, and the college is making all efforts to preserve the progress made. Now all new staff will be able to take the course when hired, and there are two meetings a semester to evaluate how well simulation principles are being applied in the classrooms.

While the training may be costly, Dean Patricia Ravert believes that simulation is “really integral to our program” and thus merits the effort to advance it.

“We want to have a top-notch program, which we do, and we want to maintain that,” she says. “We want to make sure that the students really have great experiences.” Both she and Hunsaker believe that the training establishes a stronger base of unity and understanding among the simulation staff.

“It really brings us together as a team because we all have the same foundation now,” Hunsaker says. “We all know we can all give good, valid information, not that it was bad before, but I think that it just brought everything together and provided so much consistency. Now we’re all using the same terminology. We all know how a sim is supposed to run.”

 

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