Student Spotlight: Sarah Chapple

By Mindy Longhurst

applonie

An image of Sarah Chapple with the Women’s Chorus director Jean Applonie and others. Image courtesy of Chapple.

Ever since Sarah Chapple was little she had two major passions: singing and nursing. She applies both of these passions by being a first semester nursing student and a member of BYU Women’s Chorus. Her love for singing developed as a child, while learning how to play the piano. Chapple and her older sister would practice harmonizing the hymns, and her love for music took off from there.

Chapple discovered her love for nursing while being around younger children. Chapple has always loved taking care of and helping babies. This passion for helping others inspired her to want to study nursing. Of her desire to study nursing, Chapple says, “What helped me to decide to continue pursuing nursing is how dedicated I was even though I knew it would be hard. That made me feel if I wasn’t supposed to do it, I wouldn’t want to do it so badly.”

Chapple started performing in Women’s Chorus her first semester at BYU. This is her fourth semester in Women’s Chorus and she has loved every minute of it! Chapple explains, “Women’s Chorus has been a really good outlet to have a passion while being busy with school and college life. Something that I really like about Women’s Chorus is that Sister Applonie integrates a holistic approach to teaching so that we focus on the AIMs of BYU. We talk about how to increase our spirituality while we are learning about music and while we are developing our skills. We also learn what we can do to be more in tune with ourselves, including how to stay healthy both spiritually and emotionally. It is about making us better people.”

IMG_4148

An image of Chapple (front row, center) and her family after a Women’s Chorus performance. Image courtesy of Chapple.

Juggling nursing school and Women’s Chorus at times has been challenging. Women’s Chorus meets Monday through Wednesday and on Friday. Luckily, Sister Applonie, the director of Women’s Chorus has been able to work with Chapple’s nursing schedule.

This semester during Women’s Chorus, they have had several shows including a choir showcase, a performance at a BYU devotional, BYU Spectacular! and a Christmas showcase concert. During the BYU Spectacular! performance this year, the Women’s Chorus sang an arrangement of “This Is Me” from the movie The Greatest Showman. During this song, each of the 180 women of Women’s Chorus dressed up in an outfit that represents who they really are. Naturally, Chapple chose to wear her BYU College of Nursing scrubs. She says, “They gave us some ideas for what to use as costumes, and one of them was scrubs! And so, I signed up to wear my College of Nursing scrubs. I am really proud to be in the nursing program and excited about it, so I’ll wear my scrubs whenever I can. The song is “This Is Me” and this really is me! I am learning how to be a nurse and I love taking care of people. This was a great way for me to show my passion.”

 

 

Advertisements

Here’s to a Great Retirement!

By Mindy Longhurst

Ken Robinson Headshot

A photo of Ken Robinson. Image courtesy of BYU Photo.

Ken Robinson, the IT Manager for the College of Nursing, has been a great help to the College of Nursing. Robinson was trained in electronics while he was in the Air Force in his youth. Later, he received his degree in Computer Science from Weber State University.

Robinson started working for the College of Nursing around the time that his daughter started attending BYU. Robinson has been working as the IT Manager for the College of Nursing for the past 20 years! Since his time here, a lot has changed in the technology world. When he first arrived, many faculty and staff members were not accustomed to working regularly with computers and the latest technology of the day, floppy disks. Now, 20 years later, he has loved helping faculty and staff members become more familiar with using technology.

smilingA photo of Robinson fixing a computer. Image courtesy of Zak Gowans.

There have been several changes to technology since Robinson started working here. The biggest change has been within the last four years, as the newly constructed Nurses Learning Center (NLC) has been updated and become more of a technology center. Of this change Robinson says, “Prior to the newly constructed NLC, we had a little bit, but not as much technology as we have in there today. They started talking about getting electronic health records (E.H.R.) when I started working here, but we did not get it until the remodel four years ago. After the remodel, we had a special room for the equipment that was running the NLC. I switched and spent most of my time in the NLC.” Along with E.H.R., there are significantly more manikins and simulation labs that feel real to the students. Robinson’s legacy over his long stay at the College of Nursing is helping faculty and staff members be more comfortable with using technology.

handsRobinson working on a computer. Image courtesy of Zak Gowans.

Robinson plans on spending time with his 7 children and 21 grandchildren after retirement. He has built a shop in his backyard so that he can teach his grandchildren. He plans on teaching his grandchildren important skills like electronics, computers, model rockets and wood work. He also looks forward to spending more time with his wife and helping his children.

 

 

Student Spotlight: Elina Chun

By Quincey Taylor

IMG_5342

Photo of Elina Chun. Photo courtesy of Quincey Taylor.

Even though she only stands at four feet and eleven inches tall, BYU College of Nursing student Elina Chun is a giant within her field and has big plans and dreams. Graduating this December, Chun reflects on her journey at BYU with fondness and looks forward to the future with anticipation.

Chun is part of the Honors Program for BYU students. She is one of two current nursing Honors students, and one of seven nursing students that have completed the program in the last decade. This program, whose aim is “to develop student-scholars from across the university who will become broad thinkers, creative problem solvers, and influential leaders” was a vital part to Chun’s experience here at the university. Chun took honors GE’s, went on a study abroad as part of her experiential learning, and created and defended an Honors Thesis. Her thesis, titled “Student Perspectives on Working in Interdisciplinary Teams to Improve Maternal and Newborn Care Using mHealth Solutions” will be published at the end of the semester.

Chun decided to enter the Honors Program because she always knew she wanted to go to graduate school. Defending a thesis while still an undergraduate seemed like a great way to prepare in a safe environment. She also loved the idea of interdisciplinary learning. She has enjoyed associating with professors and students in different areas of study. Chun also decided to do a business minor to be more well-rounded.

Service is also an essential part of Chun’s everyday life. Her personal mission statement – To give my best self to help others because of Him – inspires her to serve at every chance possible. She has been a program director at Y-Serve for the past two years. Before that, she served a mission in Tokyo, Japan. Balancing all these aspects of her life is something that Chun considers one of her strengths.

When asked how she chose to go into nursing, Chun expresses how she always wanted to build a life of service for herself. She was influenced by her father, who is a doctor as well as one of the most patient and kind men she knows. Plus, she laughs, “My favorite book when I was a kid was an anatomy book.”

Chun hopes to leave a legacy of service and inspire others to achieve great things. Her advice to the incoming generation of nursing students is that “Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ will inspire you to know your gifts and talents. Then you’ll be able to know what to do with them.”

After graduation, Chun plans on continuing working doing pediatrics at Primary Children’s Hospital. She has enjoyed working in the float pool there and experiencing something different each day. She is currently applying to graduate school at the University of Utah.

For any students that are interested in doing the Honors Program and broadening your perspective, please contact Dr. Deborah Himes at deborah-himes@byu.edu. She would love to help you in any way possible.

 

Nurses with Shin Guards

By Quincey Taylor

received_249630995738740_1541627770886_001

Nursing students get ready for a game. Image courtesy of McKenzie Phillips.

If any injuries occur on the intramural soccer field, the injured can trust that they are in good hands. This fall semester, a team completely comprised of BYU nursing students came together to play intramural soccer. As these students strengthen their bond as a team, they prove that nursing students do much more than just study.

These students have grown closer as they play together. Elizabeth Eide, nursing student and team member, says, “We always have such a fun time, even if we’re losing. The sense of camaraderie is unlike any that I’ve felt with other teams. We know each other, we like each other, and we have each other’s backs! The sense of friendship and teamwork is incredible. It’s been an awesome season.”

These students become closer as they get to know each other outside the NLC. Rachel Sorenson comments, “It’s just so fun to do something not nursing-related with nursing friends!”

Julia Littledike adds, “A lot of the other teams we play, when they find out we’re a nursing team, always make comments like, ‘Oh, we’re in good hands now’ or ‘We’re safe.’ I think that’s pretty funny.”

Come out and support our team this Saturday at 10am.

received_704822883207616_1541627770938_001

Image courtesy of McKenzie Phillips.

Honoring Veterans on a Utah Honor Flight

By Mindy Longhurst

image

An image of Sandra Rogers and Mary Williams with their veterans before leaving for Washington D.C. Image courtesy of Rogers.

Once a year, the College of Nursing sponsors a Utah Honor Flight. An Honor Flight is meant to recognize and show appreciation for those who have served and sacrificed for our country. During this experience, these veterans are each assigned a guardian to take care of them. The veterans fly from Salt Lake City to Washington D.C. where they are able to look at many historical and memorial sites for the wars they served in.

This year, we had nursing students and faculty members participate in the Utah Honor Flight. Also in attendance was Sandra Rogers, the International Vice President for Brigham Young University. Rogers is the former dean and nursing alum of the College of Nursing.

Both Rogers and associate professor Dr. Mary Williams had uncles who made the ultimate sacrifice giving their lives in the service of their country. Because of these experiences, both were raised in homes where gratitude and appreciation for those who have served our country were readily expressed.

8456

An image of Rogers with others at the WWII Memorial at the Washington Mall. Image courtesy of Rogers.

Sandra Rogers’ experience

During their time in Washington D.C., the veterans and guardians were able to visit many historical and memorial sites. They first visited the National Archives Museum, where the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights are showcased. Rogers explains how impactful this was for the veterans, “I did not anticipate how much the veterans appreciated seeing the archives. It was like it was in their patriotic DNA, it was part of one of the reasons why they had served. These were the documents that set out the freedoms that they were defending and what they were fighting for.”

Following the National Archives Museum, they attended the WWII Memorial where Congressional Contingency from Utah were there to greet the veterans and express their appreciation. While in Washington D.C., they also visited the Lincoln Memorial, the Vietnam Memorial, the Korean Memorial, Fort McHenry where Francis Scott Key penned “The Star Spangled Banner” and they were able to attend the Arlington National Cemetery.

Throughout her experience with the Utah Honor Flight, Sandra Rogers was constantly amazed by the organization and efficiency of the program. There was always someone to help with food and travel. She was impressed with teaching professor Dr. Kent Blad who organizes the event for the College of Nursing global and public health nursing course practicum. Being a veteran himself, Blad has a love for those who have served this country, and that was evident throughout the entire experience.

The ultimate lesson that Rogers was able to learn was about the importance of gratitude. It surprised her during the Honor Flight experience how complete strangers would come up to the veterans and individually thank them for the service and sacrifice they made for this country. She was amazed by the crowds of people in the airports with signs and banners cheering for the veterans. She says, “I looked at these veterans on the bus and I thought about the families that worried about them, the families that prayed for them while they were gone, the families that hoped heaven would watch over their loved one while they were providing this service.” After this experience, she now says that she is more motivated to approach a veteran and ask where they served and to give thanks for their service.

8457

Image of Williams and Rogers and their veterans at the Korean War Memorial at the Washington Mall. Image courtesy of Rogers.

Mary Williams’ experience

Williams loved the experience that she had during the Utah Honor flight! A moment that she remembers clearly is when the veteran for whom she was guardian visited the Lincoln Memorial. Her veteran served in the Korean War and is an artist. He really wanted to observe the artistic beauty of the Lincoln Memorial. She says of this experience, “At the Lincoln Memorial, my veteran was so desirous to view the Lincoln Memorial. That day the elevators were broken, but he was determined to climb the many steps to the top so he could experience the memorial and he did so with great energy.”

Williams expressed how life-changing this experience was for her. She was able to take the time to learn about their war stories and to learn about their lives. She says, “My life has been changed forever. I was again reminded that freedom is not free. The price for freedom is paid with blood, tears, loss of life and sacrifice of families. I was indeed overwhelmed with gratitude for the men and women who sacrifice so much. Truly, this experience was one of the highlights of my life with love of country and freedom etched on my heart forever and gratitude for those who keep it free never to be forgotten.”

 

 

Nursing Students’ Posters Win International Competition

By Quincey Taylor

IMG_3329

Caitlin Ferderber presenting her poster at the conference. Photo courtesy of Ferderber

BYU nursing students Chelsea Van Wagenen and Caitlin Ferderber had the chance to attend the International Association of Forensic Nurses Conference of 2018. Held in Reno, Nevada from October 24 to 27, these students mingled with top tier Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) of the nation. Each student entered a medical poster they had created to be judged, informing viewers about a certain topic within SANE nursing. They represented BYU well, bringing home not only first place but also a second place win.

Van Wagenen entered a poster informing viewers about strangulation during sexual assault:

Poster 1

Judges were impressed with the poster and the high quality research. Van Wagenen’s entry won second place.

She enjoyed the conference and says about the experience, “I just have felt very blessed to have the opportunity to go and participate in this conference as an undergrad. The conference was an amazing opportunity to learn about SANE nursing. It made me realize that there is so much more out there to learn and the importance of continuing to educate ourselves beyond nursing school. The conference also made me realize the impact research has on nursing and how it is important to stay up-to-date on the current practices.”

Ferderber’s poster educated viewers about characteristics of male sexual assault victims, and won first place.

Poster 3

She comments on the experience, “I was just honored to have been accepted to present my poster and hadn’t expected to win anything for it. I also felt extremely grateful to have been able to work with Julie Valentine, Leslie Miles, and Linda Mabey on their study. They are amazing, and I have learned so much from working with them.”

Ferderber explains about her choice of topic she put on her poster, “One of the major differences we found between female and male victims was that males are more likely to be assaulted by a stranger or person in authority. Men are also less likely to have a CODIS eligible profile developed, which can hurt their case if they decide to prosecute. I really enjoyed the conference and learned more about forensic nursing as well as how to better care for victims of sexual assault. The ugly truth is that sexual assault, abuse, and other forms of violence are far too common. I hope to take what I’ve learned and apply it to my practice so that I can help victims as they go through these traumatic experiences.”

Student Spotlight: Angela Nickerl

By Mindy Longhurst

Angela with little girl

Image of Angela Nickerl with a girl from her Ghana public and global health nursing course practicum. Image courtesy of Nickerl.

Being a non-traditional student (a student 30 years of age and older) at BYU can sometimes be challenging. But, College of Nursing fifth semester student, Angela Nickerl loves the experiences she has had as a non-traditional student. Nickerl is older than most BYU students, but loves the opportunity to share the wisdom she has gained throughout her life.

Ever since Nickerl was in high school she knew that she wanted to become a nurse. She says, “Throughout my experience being a mother in healthcare, I noticed that the nurses made a huge difference and impact on their patients.” Nickerl’s journey to becoming a nurse was very spiritual. She loves to learn about the body. Taking care of someone who is sick is a spiritual experience that brings her closer to God.

Nickerl started taking some nursing prerequisite courses while her family was living in California several years ago. When her family decided to move to Utah, she was able to apply to BYU and the nursing program and was accepted into both.

familyAn image of Nickerl’s children. Image courtesy of Nickerl.

At the time that she started at BYU (January 2016) three of her children were going to college. Now, all five of Nickerl’s children are currently going to college. This helps Nickerl to be able to relate more to her children. Nickerl explains, “It is interesting having my children in school with me at the same time. It can be stressful because we are all stressed about midterms and finals at the same time. But, this has helped me to be able to relate to my children so much more!”

Overall, Nickerl has enjoyed her time within the nursing program. She expounds, “I love the nursing program at BYU! Often in the middle of a busy semester it is difficult to find positive things because you’re tired. However, in spite of being tired, one of my favorite parts of the program is that our professors truly embrace our school motto, learning the Healer’s art. We are taught that in every setting, we should care for people the way the Savior would. Reading a nursing textbook and studying for the NCLEX is going to be the same regardless of where you study, but at BYU we are taught our nursing skills from a different perspective. Not only are we encouraged to view our patients differently, but our professors model it by treating us that way. I think they are phenomenal examples of what they teach about the Savior.”

group photoImage of Nickerl with other nursing students. Image courtesy of Nickerl.

Nickerl has some advice for those who are non-traditional students. She says, “Being a non-traditional student, I feel like I value what I am learning more because it really is my choice to be here. Sometimes when you are younger you do it because it is the social norm. As someone older, this is not the right thing I am supposed to be doing with my life. A lot of people are often surprised when they find out that I am a college student. I am grateful for the things that I am learning, because I am choosing to be here.”

Another lesson she has learned is the importance of balancing her schedule. She explains, “If you absolutely know that you are supposed to be doing school and you know that the Lord is supporting you in it, then it all fits. If you are doing what the Lord wants you to do, if you are putting your priorities in order, if you are attending the temple, serving in your church calling, if you are putting your family time first, then Heavenly Father makes it fit. That is something that I have felt over and over again. And I feel like my relationship with the Savior has been strengthened as a result of nursing school.”

In the future, Nickerl hopes to become an oncology nurse.